A Shining Thread of Hope


Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Kathleen Thompson
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307568229
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 1518

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At the greatest moments and in the cruelest times, black women have been a crucial part of America's history. Now, the inspiring history of black women in America is explored in vivid detail by two leaders in the fields of African American and women's history. A Shining Thread of Hope chronicles the lives of black women from indentured servitude in the early American colonies to the cruelty of antebellum plantations, from the reign of lynch law in the Jim Crow South to the triumphs of the Civil Rights era, and it illustrates how the story of black women in America is as much a tale of courage and hope as it is a history of struggle. On both an individual and a collective level, A Shining Thread of Hope reveals the strength and spirit of black women and brings their stories from the fringes of American history to a central position in our understanding of the forces and events that have shaped this country. From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Shining Thread of Hope

The History of Black Women in America
Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Kathleen Thompson
Publisher: Broadway
ISBN: 0767901118
Category: Social Science
Page: 355
View: 4526

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Presents a survey of the experience and achievements of African American women and their impact on American culture

A Shining Thread of Hope

The History of Black Women in America
Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Kathleen Thompson
Publisher: Turtleback
ISBN: 9780613175043
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 4735

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Traces the accomplishments, trials, and triumphs of black women in 400 years of American history.

Hine Sight

Black Women and the Re-construction of American History
Author: Darlene Clark Hine
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253211248
Category: History
Page: 290
View: 8783

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"The history of African American women has become an important topic in the intellectual life of this country in the last fifteen years; and Darlene Clark Hine has been one of those most responsible for bringing the subject to its current level of importance." —from the Foreword by John Hope Franklin "In this absolutely needed collection of essays by one of the leading American historians of our generation, the richly intertwined community-making and self-making that shaped the historical experience of African American women shines out like a beacon." —Susan M. Reverby, Luella LaMer Associate Professor for Women's Studies, Wellesley College

Crossing Boundaries

Comparative History of Black People in Diaspora
Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Jacqueline McLeod
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253214508
Category: History
Page: 491
View: 4797

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Now in paperback! Crossing Boundaries Comparative History of Black People in Diaspora Edited by Darlene Clark Hine and Jacqueline McLeod Suggests new paradigms for the study of Blacks in diaspora. "The 18 papers in this volume are original, clearly written, and of consistently high quality. Organized in four parts—'Comparative Diaspora Historiography,' 'Identity and Culture,' 'Domination and Resistance,' and 'Geo-Social History and the Atlantic World'—these essays complement each other in a way that makes the whole even more valuable than the sum of the parts." —Choice The essays assembled in Crossing Boundaries reflect the international dimensions, commonalities, and discontinuities in the histories of diasporan communities of color. People of African descent in the New World (the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean) share a common set of experiences: domination and resistance, slavery and emancipation, the pursuit of freedom, and struggle against racism. No single explanation can capture the varied experiences of Black people in diaspora. Crossing Boundaries probes differences embedded in Black ethnicities and helps to discover and to weave into a new understanding the threads of experience, culture, and identity across diasporas. Contributors include Allison Blakely, Kim Butler, Frederick Cooper, George Fredrickson, David Barry Gaspar, Jack P. Green, Thomas Holt, Earl Lewis, Elliott Skinner, and Rosalyn Terborg-Penn. Darlene Clark Hine, John A. Hannah Professor of History at Michigan State University, is author of Hine Sight: Black Women and the Re-Construction of American History (Indiana University Press); co-author of A Shining Thread of Hope: The History of Black Women in America and The African American Odyssey; and co-editor of More Than Chattel: Black Women and Slavery in the Americas and A Question of Manhood: A Reader in Black Men's History and Masculinity (both Indiana University Press). Jacqueline McLeod is Assistant Professor of History at Western Illinois University. She holds a J.D. degree from the University of Toledo College of Law. Blacks in the Diaspora—Darlene Clark Hine, John McCluskey, Jr., David Barry Gaspar, general editors March 2001 (cloth 1999) 520 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4, 1 fig., notes, index cloth 0-253-33542-6 $29.95 L / £22.95 paper 0-253-21450-5 $17.95 s / £13.95

A Question of Manhood

A Reader in U.S. Black Men's History and Masculinity
Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Earnestine Jenkins
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253214607
Category: History
Page: 482
View: 3745

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A Question of Manhood: A Reader in Black Men's History and Masculinity, is the first anthology of historical studies focused on themes and issues central to the construction of Black masculinities. The editors identified these essays from among several hundred articles published in recent years in leading American history journals and academic periodicals. Volume II picks up where volume I left off, continuing to focus on gender by examining the lives of African American men in the tumultuous period following the Civil War through the end of the nineteenth century. The writings included in volume two cover themes in the lives of black men that touch on leadership, work and the professions, family and community, sports and the military, and the image of black men in the larger society.

Black Victory

The Rise and Fall of the White Primary in Texas
Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Steven F. Lawson,Merline Pitre
Publisher: University of Missouri
ISBN: 9780826214621
Category: History
Page: 283
View: 1873

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In Black Victory, Darlene Clark Hine examines a pivotal breakthrough in the struggle for black liberation through the voting process. She details the steps and players in the 1944 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Smith v. Allwright, a precursor to the 1965 Voting Rights Act. She discusses the role that NAACP attorneys such as Thurgood Marshall played in helping black Texans regain the right denied them by white Texans in the Democratic Party: the right to vote and to have that vote count. Hine illuminates the mobilization of black Texans. She effectively demonstrates how each part of the African American community--from professionals to laborers--was essential to this struggle and the victory against disfranchisement.

The Face of Our Past

Images of Black Women from Colonial America to the Present
Author: Kathleen Thompson,Hilary Austin
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253336354
Category: Social Science
Page: 258
View: 8810

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Examines the history of African American women through photographs, with sections focusing on family life, work, and class

We Specialize in the Wholly Impossible

A Reader in Black Women's History
Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Wilma King
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0926019813
Category: History
Page: 618
View: 7318

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Contains essays which share the experiences and emphasize the achievements and struggles of Black women from colonial times through the 20th century

African Americans

A Concise History
Author: Darlene Clark Hine,William C. Hine,Stanley Harrold
Publisher: Prentice Hall
ISBN: 9780205108862
Category: Social Science
Page: 432
View: 4712

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ALERT: Before you purchase, check with your instructor or review your course syllabus to ensure that you select the correct ISBN. Several versions of Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products exist for each title, including customized versions for individual schools, and registrations are not transferable. In addition, you may need a CourseID, provided by your instructor, to register for and use Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products. Packages Access codes for Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products may not be included when purchasing or renting from companies other than Pearson; check with the seller before completing your purchase. Used or rental books If you rent or purchase a used book with an access code, the access code may have been redeemed previously and you may have to purchase a new access code. Access codes Access codes that are purchased from sellers other than Pearson carry a higher risk of being either the wrong ISBN or a previously redeemed code. Check with the seller prior to purchase. -- A compelling story of agency, survival, struggle and triumph over adversity. This text illuminates the central place of African Americans in U.S. history by telling the story of what it has meant to be black in America and how African-American history is inseparably woven into the greater context of American history. African Americans draws on recent research to present black history within broad social, cultural and political frameworks. From Africa to the 21st century, this book follows the long turbulent journey of African Americans, the rich culture they have nurtured throughout their history and the quest for freedom through which African Americans have sought to counter oppression and racism. This text also recognizes the diversity within the African-American sphere, providing coverage of class and gender and balancing the lives of ordinary men and women with accounts of black leaders. Note: MyHistoryLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MyHistoryLab at no extra charge, please visit www.MyHistoryLab.com or use ISBN: 9780205090754.

The African-American Odyssey


Author: Darlene Clark Hine,William C. Hine,Stanley C. Harrold
Publisher: Pearson Higher Ed
ISBN: 0205949894
Category: History
Page: 504
View: 2427

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A compelling story of agency, survival, struggle and triumph over adversity More than any other text, The African-American Odyssey illuminates the central place of African-Americans in U.S. history by telling the story of what it has meant to be black in America and how African-American history is inseparably woven into the greater context of American history. From Africa to the 21st century, this book follows the long and turbulent journey of African-Americans, the rich culture they have nurtured throughout their history and the quest for freedom through which African-Americans have sought to counter oppression and racism. This text also recognizes the diversity within the African-American sphere, providing coverage of class and gender and balancing the lives of ordinary men and women with accounts of black leaders and the impact each has had on the struggle for freedom. MyHistoryLab is an integral part of the Hine program. Key learning applications include Closer Looks, MyHistoryLibrary, and writing assessment. A better teaching and learning experience This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience—for you and your students. Here’s how: Personalize Learning– MyHistoryLab is online learning. MyHistoryLab engages students through personalized learning and helps instructors from course preparation to delivery and assessment. Improve Critical Thinking–Features throughout the text encourage students to think critically about the material. Engage Students– Features such as “Voices from the Odyssey” engage students in the material. Support Instructors– A full set of supplements, including MyHistoryLab, provides instructors with all the resources and support they need. NOTE: MyHistoryLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MyHistoryLab, please visit www.myhistorylab.com or you can purchase a ValuePack of the text + MyHistoryLab: ValuePack ISBN-10: 0205961614 / ValuePack ISBN-13: 9780205961610

Time Longer Than Rope

A Century of African American Activism, 1850-1950
Author: Charles M. Payne,Adam Green
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814767028
Category: History
Page: 584
View: 7409

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The story of the civil rights movement is well-known, popularized by both the media and the academy. Yet the version of the story recounted time and again by both history books and PBS documentaries is a simplified one, reduced to an inspirational but ultimately facile narrative framed around Dr. King, the Kennedys, and the redemptive days of Montgomery and Memphis, in which black individuals become the rescued survivors. This story renders the mass of black people invisible, refusing to take seriously everyday people whose years of persistent struggle often made the big events possible. Time Longer than Rope unearths the ordinary roots of extraordinary change, demonstrating the depth and breadth of black oppositional spirit and activity that preceded the civil rights movement. The diversity of activism covered by this collection extends from tenant farmers' labor reform campaign in the 1919 Elaine, Arkansas massacre to Harry T. Moore’s leadership of a movement that registered 100,000 black Floridians years before Montgomery, and from women's participation in the Garvey movement to the changing meaning of the Lincoln Memorial. Concentrating on activist efforts in the South, key themes emerge, including the under appreciated importance of historical memory and community building, the divisive impact of class and sexism, and the shifting interplay between individual initiative and structural constraints. More than simply illuminating a hitherto marginalized fragment of American history, Time Longer than Rope provides a crucial pre-history of the modern civil rights movement. In the process, it alters our entire understanding of African American activism and the very meaning of “civil rights.”

The Black Chicago Renaissance


Author: Darlene Clark Hine,John McCluskey
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252094395
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 797

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Beginning in the 1930s, Black Chicago experienced a cultural renaissance that lasted into the 1950s and rivaled the cultural outpouring in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. The contributors to this volume analyze this prolific period of African American creativity in music, performance art, social science scholarship, and visual and literary artistic expression. Unlike Harlem, Chicago was an urban industrial center that gave a unique working class and internationalist perspective to the cultural work being done in Chicago. This collection's various essays discuss the forces that distinguished the Black Chicago Renaissance from the Harlem Renaissance and placed the development of black culture in a national and international context. Among the topics discussed in this volume are Chicago writers Gwendolyn Brooks and Richard Wright, The Chicago Defender and Tivoli Theater, African American music and visual arts, and the American Negro Exposition of 1940. Contributors are Hilary Mac Austin, David T. Bailey, Murry N. DePillars, Samuel A. Floyd Jr., Erik S. Gellman, Jeffrey Helgeson, Darlene Clark Hine, John McCluskey Jr., Christopher Robert Reed, Elizabeth Schlabach, and Clovis E. Semmes.

African Americans, A Concise History Volume 1

A Concise History
Author: Darlene Clark Hine,William C. Hine,Stanley C. Harrold
Publisher: Pearson Higher Ed
ISBN: 020596978X
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 5450

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A compelling story of agency, survival, struggle and triumph over adversity African Americans: A Concise History illuminates the central place of African-Americans in U.S. history by telling the story of what it has meant to be black in America and how African-American history is inseparably woven into the greater context of American history. It follows the long and turbulent journey of African-Americans, the rich culture they have nurtured throughout their history and the quest for freedom through which African-Americans have sought to counter oppression and racism. MyHistoryLab is an integral part of the Hine / Hine / Harrold program. Key learning applications include Closer Looks, MyHistoryLibrary, and writing assessment. A better teaching and learning experience This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience–for you and your students. Here’s how: Personalize Learning - MyHistoryLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program. It helps students prepare for class and instructor gauge individual and class performance. Improve Critical Thinking - Focus Questions and end-of-chapter Review Questions help students think critically about the chapter content. Engage Students - Voices boxes engage students in the works and words of African Americans. Support Instructors - A full set of supplements, including MyHistory, provides instructors with all the resources and support they need. Note: MyHistoryLab does not come automatically packaged with this text.

The Light Between Worlds


Author: Laura E. Weymouth
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062696890
Category: Young Adult Fiction
Page: 368
View: 7599

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What happens when you return to the real world after being in a fantastical one like Narnia? This YA debut by Laura E. Weymouth is perfect for fans of Melissa Albert’s The Hazel Wood and Lev Grossman’s The Magicians. Six years ago, sisters Evelyn and Philippa Hapwell were swept away to a strange and beautiful kingdom called the Woodlands, where they lived for years. But ever since they returned to their lives in post-WWII England, they have struggled to adjust. Ev desperately wants to return to the Woodlands, and Philippa just wants to move on. When Ev goes missing, Philippa must confront the depth of her sister’s despair and the painful truths they’ve been running from. As the weeks unfold, Philippa wonders if Ev truly did find a way home, or if the weight of their worlds pulled her under. Walking the line between where fantasy and reality meet, this lyrical and magical novel is, above all else, an exploration of loss and healing, and what it means to find where you belong.

The Tale of Despereaux

Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread
Author: Kate DiCamillo
Publisher: Candlewick Press
ISBN: 0763649430
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 272
View: 2776

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The adventures of Desperaux Tilling, a small mouse of unusual talents, the princess that he loves, the servant girl who longs to be a princess, and a devious rat determined to bring them all to ruin.

Children of the Depression


Author: Kathleen Thompson,Hilary Austin
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 193
View: 3333

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A poignant photographic tour of the Great Depression features images of children at play, at school, and at home from across the country, all taken by Depression-era FSA photographers.

The Shining Girls

A Novel
Author: Lauren Beukes
Publisher: Mulholland Books
ISBN: 0316216844
Category: Fiction
Page: 384
View: 4326

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THE GIRL WHO WOULDN'T DIE HUNTS THE KILLER WHO SHOULDN'T EXIST. The future is not as loud as war, but it is relentless. It has a terrible fury all its own." Harper Curtis is a killer who stepped out of the past. Kirby Mazrachi is the girl who was never meant to have a future. Kirby is the last shining girl, one of the bright young women, burning with potential, whose lives Harper is destined to snuff out after he stumbles on a House in Depression-era Chicago that opens on to other times. At the urging of the House, Harper inserts himself into the lives of the shining girls, waiting for the perfect moment to strike. He's the ultimate hunter, vanishing into another time after each murder, untraceable-until one of his victims survives. Determined to bring her would-be killer to justice, Kirby joins the Chicago Sun-Times to work with the ex-homicide reporter, Dan Velasquez, who covered her case. Soon Kirby finds herself closing in on the impossible truth . . . THE SHINING GIRLS is a masterful twist on the serial killer tale: a violent quantum leap featuring a memorable and appealing heroine in pursuit of a deadly criminal.

The Great Southern Babylon

Sex, Race, and Respectability in New Orleans, 1865--1920
Author: Alecia P. Long
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807131121
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 3584

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In Struggle Against Jim Crow

Lulu B. White and the NAACP, 1900-1957
Author: Merline Pitre
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781603441995
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 181
View: 2934

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African American women have played significant roles in the ongoing struggle for freedom and equality, but relatively little is known about many of these leaders and activists. Most accounts of the civil rights movement focus on male leaders and the organizations they led, leaving a dearth of information about the countless black women who were the backbone of the struggle in local communities across the country. At the local level women helped mold and shape the direction the movement would take. Lulu B. White was one of those women in the civil rights movement in Texas. Executive secretary of the Houston branch of the NAACP and state director of branches, White was a significant force in the struggle against Jim Crow during the 1940s and 1950s. She was at the helm of the Houston chapter when the Supreme Court struck down the white primary in Smith v. Allbright, and she led the fight to get more blacks elected to public office, to gain economic parity for African Americans, and to integrate the University of Texas. Author Merline Pitre places White in her proper perspective in Texas, Southern, African American, women's, and general American history; points to White's successes and achievements, as well as the problems and conflicts she faced in efforts to eradicate segregation; and looks at the strategies and techniques White used in her leadership roles. Pitre effectively places White within the context of twentieth-century Houston and the civil rights movement that was gripping the state. In Struggle Against Jim Crow is pertinent to the understanding of race, gender, interest group politics, and social reform during this turbulent era. Merline Pitre is professor of history and former dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Texas Southern University. Her specialization is U.S. Reconstruction and African American history, particularly in Texas.