A People's History of the American Revolution

How Common People Shaped the Fight for Independence
Author: Ray Raphael
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1620972808
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 1620

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Upon its first publication in 2001 as the inaugural volume in The New Press People’s History series, edited by the late Howard Zinn, Ray Raphael’s magisterial A People’s History of the American Revolution was hailed by Fresh Air as “relentlessly aggressive and unsentimental.” With impeccable skill, Raphael presented a wide array of fascinating scholarship within a single volume, employing a bottom-up approach that has served as a revelation to thousands of Americans. A People’s History of the American Revolution draws upon diaries, personal letters, and other Revolutionary-era treasures, weaving a thrilling, “you are there” narrative—“a tapestry that uses individual experiences to illustrate the larger stories” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). In the trademark style of Howard Zinn, Raphael shifts the focus away from George Washington and Thomas Jefferson to the slaves they owned, the Indians they displaced, and the men and boys who did the fighting. This “remarkable perspective on a familiar part of American history” (Kirkus) helps us appreciate more fully the incredible diversity of the American Revolution by helping us see it through different sets of eyes.

A People's History of the American Revolution

How Common People Shaped the Fight for Independence
Author: Ray Raphael
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0060004401
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 2460

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A sweeping narrative of the wartime experience, A People's History of the American Revolution is the first book to view the revolution through the eyes of common folk. Their stories have long been overlooked in the mythic telling of America's founding, but are crucial to a comprehensive understanding of the fight for independence. Now, the experiences of farmers, laborers, rank and file soldiers, women, Native Americans, and African Americans -- found in diaries, letters, memoirs and other long-ignored primary sources -- create a gritty account of rebellion, filled with ideals and outrage, loss, sacrifice, and sometimes scurrilous acts...but always ringing with truth.

A People's History of the American Revolution

How Common People Shaped the Fight for Independence
Author: Ray Raphael
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1595588515
Category: History
Page: 386
View: 6496

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The best single-volume history of the Revolution I have read. —Howard Zinn The first major effort to tell the history of the American Revolution from the often overlooked standpoints of its everyday participants, A People’s History of the American Revolution is a highly accessible narrative of the wartime experience that brings in the stories of previously marginalized voices: the common people, slave and free, who made up the majority in eighteenth-century America. This first volume in The New Press People’s History Series skillfully weaves diaries, personal letters, and other long-overlooked primary source material into the historical narrative. The result is a remarkable first-person perspective on the events leading up to and during the war. With a simple shift of the focus of history’s lens—away from Revolutionary leaders such as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson and on to the slaves they owned, the Indians they displaced, and the men and boys who did the fighting—author Ray Raphael brings us a true people’s history of the Revolutionary experience.

American Insurgents, American Patriots

The Revolution of the People
Author: T. H. Breen
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9781429932608
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 5511

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Before there could be a revolution, there was a rebellion; before patriots, there were insurgents. Challenging and displacing decades of received wisdom, T. H. Breen's strikingly original book explains how ordinary Americans—most of them members of farm families living in small communities—were drawn into a successful insurgency against imperial authority. This is the compelling story of our national political origins that most Americans do not know. It is a story of rumor, charity, vengeance, and restraint. American Insurgents, American Patriots reminds us that revolutions are violent events. They provoke passion and rage, a willingness to use violence to achieve political ends, a deep sense of betrayal, and a strong religious conviction that God expects an oppressed people to defend their rights. The American Revolution was no exception. A few celebrated figures in the Continental Congress do not make for a revolution. It requires tens of thousands of ordinary men and women willing to sacrifice, kill, and be killed. Breen not only gives the history of these ordinary Americans but, drawing upon a wealth of rarely seen documents, restores their primacy to American independence. Mobilizing two years before the Declaration of Independence, American insurgents in all thirteen colonies concluded that resistance to British oppression required organized violence against the state. They channeled popular rage through elected committees of safety and observation, which before 1776 were the heart of American resistance. American Insurgents, American Patriots is the stunning account of their insurgency, without which there would have been no independent republic as we know it.

The Minutemen and Their World


Author: Robert A. Gross
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9780374706395
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 8227

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Winner of the Bancroft Prize The Minutemen and Their World, first published in 1976, is reissued now in a twenty-fifth anniversary edition with a new Foreword by Alan Taylor and a new Afterword by the author. On April 19, 1775, the American Revolution began at the Old North Bridge in Concord, Massachusetts. The "shot heard round the world" catapulted this sleepy New England town into the midst of revolutionary fervor, and Concord went on to become the intellectual capital of the new republic. The town--future home to Emerson, Thoreau, and Hawthorne--soon came to symbolize devotion to liberty, intellectual freedom, and the stubborn integrity of rural life. In The Minutemen and Their World, Robert Gross has written a remarkably subtle and detailed reconstruction of the lives and community of this special place, and a compelling interpretation of the American Revolution as a social movement.

A People's History of the U.S. Military

Ordinary Soldiers Reflect on Their Experience of War, from the American Revolution to Afghanistan
Author: Michael A. Bellesiles
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595586288
Category: History
Page: 375
View: 2608

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Draws from three centuries of soldiers' personal encounters with combat--through excerpts from letters, diaries, memoirs, audio recordings, film and blogs--to capture the essence of the American military experience firsthand, from the American Revolution to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Faces of Revolution

Personalities & Themes in the Struggle for American Independence
Author: Bernard Bailyn
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 030779847X
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 1715

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Pulitzer-Prize-winning author Bernard Bailyn brings us a book that combines portraits of American revolutionaries with a deft exploration of the ideas that moved them and still shape our society today.

The Rise of Western Power

A Comparative History of Western Civilization
Author: Jonathan Daly
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441144757
Category: History
Page: 464
View: 9890

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The West's history is one of extraordinary success; no other region, empire, culture, or civilization has left so powerful a mark upon the world. The Rise of Western Power charts the West's achievements-representative government, the free enterprise system, modern science, and the rule of law-as well as its misdeeds-two frighteningly destructive World Wars, the Holocaust, imperialistic domination, and the Atlantic slave trade. Adopting a global perspective, Jonathan Daly explores the contributions of other cultures and civilizations to the West's emergence. Historical, geographical, and cultural factors all unfold in the narrative. Adopting a thematic structure, the book traces the rise of Western power through a series of revolutions-social, political, technological, military, commercial, and industrial, among others. The result is a clear and engaging introduction to the history of Western civilization.

The American Revolution

A Historical Guidebook
Author: Frances H. Kennedy
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199324239
Category: History
Page: 480
View: 7523

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In 1996, Congress commissioned the National Park Service to compile a list of sites and landmarks connected with the American Revolution that it deemed vital to preserve for future generations. Some of these sites are well known--Bunker Hill, Valley Forge, Fort Ticonderoga--and in no danger of being lost; others less so-- Blackstock's Plantation in South Carolina or Bryan's Station in Kentucky--and more vulnerable. But all are central to the story of our nation's fight for independence. From battlefields to encampments, meeting houses to museums, these places offer us a chance to rediscover the remarkable men and women who founded this nation and to recognize the relevance of not just what they did, but where they did it. The American Revolution: A Historical Guidebook takes readers to nearly 150 of these sites, providing an overview of the Revolution through an exploration of the places where American independence was articulated, fought for, and eventually secured. Beginning with the Boston Common, first occupied by British troops in 1768, and closing with Fraunces Tavern in New York, where George Washington bid farewell to his officers on December 4, 1783, Kennedy takes readers on a tour of the most significant places of Revolutionary history. Accompanied by illuminating excerpts and essays from some of the foremost scholars in the field, including David McCullough, Barbara Tuchman, David Hackett Fischer, Eric Foner, and John Ferling, the entries move in a roughly chronological order from the pre-Revolutionary years up through 1787. Taken together, the combination of site, essay, and excerpt provides rich context and overview, giving a sense of the major figures and events as well as the course of the Revolution, and cover topics ranging from the Boston Tea Party to the frontier wars. The guide is encyclopedic in scope and covers a wide geographical sweep. Accompanied by historical maps, as well as a number of illuminating primary documents including the Declaration of Independence and letters from John Adams and George Washington, it offers a comprehensive picture of how the Revolutionary War unfolded on American soil, and also points readers to the best writing on the subject in the last fifty years. The American Revolution: A Historical Guidebook is an essential companion for anyone interested in the story and history of our nation's founding.

A People s History of Poverty in America


Author: Stephen Pimpare
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595586962
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 4002

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In this compulsively readable social history, political scientist Stephen Pimpare vividly describes poverty from the perspective of poor and welfare-reliant Americans from the big city to the rural countryside. He focuses on how the poor have created community, secured shelter, and found food and illuminates their battles for dignity and respect. Through prodigious archival research and lucid analysis, Pimpare details the ways in which charity and aid for the poor have been inseparable, more often than not, from the scorn and disapproval of those who would help them. In the rich and often surprising historical testimonies he has collected from the poor in America, Pimpare overturns any simple conclusions about how the poor see themselves or what it feels like to be poor—and he shows clearly that the poor are all too often aware that charity comes with a price. It is that price that Pimpare eloquently questions in this book, reminding us through powerful anecdotes, some heart-wrenching and some surprisingly humorous, that poverty is not simply a moral failure.

William Blake and the Impossible History of the 1790s


Author: Saree Makdisi
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226502595
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 394
View: 4494

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Modern scholars often find it difficult to account for the profound eccentricities in the work of William Blake, dismissing them as either ahistorical or simply meaningless. But with this pioneering study, Saree Makdisi develops a reliable and comprehensive framework for understanding these peculiarities. According to Makdisi, Blake's poetry and drawings should compel us to reconsider the history of the 1790s. Tracing for the first time the many links among economics, politics, and religion in his work, Makdisi shows how Blake questioned and even subverted the commercial, consumerist, and political liberties that his contemporaries championed, all while developing his own radical aesthetic.

The American Revolution

Experience the Battle for Independence
Author: Judy Dodge Cummings
Publisher: Nomad Press
ISBN: 1619302489
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 128
View: 3951

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Kids love stories about underdogs, and the American Revolution is among the most famous of these tales. Desperate to be an independent country free from Britain, the rebel colonists relied on their cunning wit and visionary leadership to win an impossible war. And then they faced the real hardship—creating a country out of a victorious but chaotic society. Using engaging text, hands-on activities, and links to primary sources, The American Revolution: Experience the Battle for Independence shows readers how rebel soldiers fought in horrific conditions while their families faced their own hardships for the sake of freedom. Students examine wartime propaganda to discover the truth about events leading up to the war, and engage in vibrant debate, strategic planning, and literary deconstruction to understand the official documents upon which America is founded. Building a marshmallow cannon and creating real colonial food are some of the projects that engage readers’ design skills. Essential questions require readers to activate their critical thinking skills to discover the truth about the most important moment in American history. The American Revolution meets Common Core State Standards for literacy in history and social studies; Guided Reading Levels and Lexile measurements indicate grade level and text complexity.

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution


Author: Edward G. Gray,Jane Kamensky
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199746702
Category: History
Page: 673
View: 8763

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The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution introduces scholars, students and generally interested readers to the formative event in American history. In thirty-three individual essays, the Handbook provides readers with in-depth analysis of the Revolution's many sides.

A People's History of the United States

1492-Present
Author: Howard Zinn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317325303
Category: History
Page: 744
View: 3172

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This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.

Founding Myths

Stories That Hide Our Patriotic Past
Author: Ray Raphael
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595589740
Category: History
Page: 432
View: 8023

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First published ten years ago, award-winning historian Ray Raphael’s Founding Myths has since established itself as a landmark of historical myth-busting. With Raphael’s trademark wit and flair, Founding Myths exposed the errors and inventions in America’s most cherished tales, from Paul Revere’s famous ride to Patrick Henry’s “Liberty or Death” speech. For the thousands who have been captivated by Raphael’s eye-opening accounts, history has never been the same. In this revised tenth-anniversary edition, Raphael revisits the original myths and further explores their evolution over time, uncovering new stories and peeling back new layers of misinformation. This new edition also examines the highly politicized debates over America’s past, as well as how our approach to history in school reinforces rather than corrects historical mistakes. A book that “explores the truth behind the stories of the making of our nation” (National Public Radio), this revised edition of Founding Myths will be a welcome resource for anyone seeking to separate historical fact from fiction.

Courageous Children and Women of the American Revolution: Through Primary Sources

Through Primary Sources
Author: John Micklos, Jr.
Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 076604131X
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 48
View: 8529

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"Discusses the lives and roles of children and women during the American Revolution, including life and work on the home front, women nurses and soldiers, and children spying and fighting in the war"--Provided by publisher.

Martyr To Freedom

The Life and Death of Captain Daniel Drayton
Author: Zachary Martin
Publisher: Hamilton Books
ISBN: 0761854231
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 130
View: 2401

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Captain Daniel Drayton was an Atlantic coastal trader and abolitionist who led a life filled with ambition but afflicted by failure. This book explores his life and questions possible motives behind his tragic suicide in the summer of 1857 in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Grass Roots

A Commonsense Action Agenda for America
Author: Scott Hennen,Jim Denney
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781451608960
Category: Political Science
Page: 400
View: 634

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Would you like to do your part in saving America? Grass Roots is a no-nonsense instruction manual that explains exactly what you can do. Scott Hennen—host and founder of the innovative Common Sense Club radio program—shows how everyday Americans just like you are making a difference for our country’s future. This down-to-earth handbook gives you clear, practical, effective actions you can take to preserve the American dream for your children and grandchildren. President Ronald Reagan once said, “All great change in America begins at the dinner table.” Today, most Americans struggle just to keep food on the dinner table. We are staggering under a crushing burden of big government, out-of-control spending, and towering federal debt. We have become tax slaves—and the people we sent to Washington to represent us are the very ones who sold us there. We’re angry—and rightly so. But ruling-class politicians have shrugged off our grassroots anger, calling it “Astroturf.” We’re tired of being ignored, patronized, and lied to by the very people who are supposed to be our “public servants.” Not since the original Boston Tea Party of 1773 have so many everyday Americans participated in such a significant display of righteous indignation and freedom-loving patriotism. For the first time in generations, ordinary hardworking, church-going Americans are carrying signs, gathering in large numbers, and making their voices heard. Big government, beware. A sleeping giant has awakened. Scott Hennen has drawn up a practical blueprint for change, a handbook for all of us who are ready to roll up our sleeves and do our part to restore America’s goodness—and greatness. Grass Roots is a political manifesto for every American who loves liberty and cares enough to get involved.

Our Lives, Our Fortunes and Our Sacred Honor

The Forging of American Independence, 1774-1776
Author: Richard R. Beeman,R Beeman
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465037828
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 5323

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Acclaimed historian Richard R. Beeman examines the grueling 22-month period between the meeting of the Continental Congress on September 5, 1774, and the audacious decision for independence in July 1775.