A People's History of the American Revolution

How Common People Shaped the Fight for Independence
Author: Ray Raphael
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1620972808
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 8759

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Upon its first publication in 2001 as the inaugural volume in The New Press People’s History series, edited by the late Howard Zinn, Ray Raphael’s magisterial A People’s History of the American Revolution was hailed by Fresh Air as “relentlessly aggressive and unsentimental.” With impeccable skill, Raphael presented a wide array of fascinating scholarship within a single volume, employing a bottom-up approach that has served as a revelation to thousands of Americans. A People’s History of the American Revolution draws upon diaries, personal letters, and other Revolutionary-era treasures, weaving a thrilling, “you are there” narrative—“a tapestry that uses individual experiences to illustrate the larger stories” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). In the trademark style of Howard Zinn, Raphael shifts the focus away from George Washington and Thomas Jefferson to the slaves they owned, the Indians they displaced, and the men and boys who did the fighting. This “remarkable perspective on a familiar part of American history” (Kirkus) helps us appreciate more fully the incredible diversity of the American Revolution by helping us see it through different sets of eyes.

Courageous Children and Women of the American Revolution: Through Primary Sources

Through Primary Sources
Author: John Micklos, Jr.
Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 076604131X
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 48
View: 3240

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"Discusses the lives and roles of children and women during the American Revolution, including life and work on the home front, women nurses and soldiers, and children spying and fighting in the war"--Provided by publisher.

The Rise of Western Power

A Comparative History of Western Civilization
Author: Jonathan Daly
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441144757
Category: History
Page: 464
View: 5003

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The West's history is one of extraordinary success; no other region, empire, culture, or civilization has left so powerful a mark upon the world. The Rise of Western Power charts the West's achievements-representative government, the free enterprise system, modern science, and the rule of law-as well as its misdeeds-two frighteningly destructive World Wars, the Holocaust, imperialistic domination, and the Atlantic slave trade. Adopting a global perspective, Jonathan Daly explores the contributions of other cultures and civilizations to the West's emergence. Historical, geographical, and cultural factors all unfold in the narrative. Adopting a thematic structure, the book traces the rise of Western power through a series of revolutions-social, political, technological, military, commercial, and industrial, among others. The result is a clear and engaging introduction to the history of Western civilization.

The American Revolution

A Historical Guidebook
Author: Frances H. Kennedy
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199324239
Category: History
Page: 480
View: 2343

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In 1996, Congress commissioned the National Park Service to compile a list of sites and landmarks connected with the American Revolution that it deemed vital to preserve for future generations. Some of these sites are well known--Bunker Hill, Valley Forge, Fort Ticonderoga--and in no danger of being lost; others less so-- Blackstock's Plantation in South Carolina or Bryan's Station in Kentucky--and more vulnerable. But all are central to the story of our nation's fight for independence. From battlefields to encampments, meeting houses to museums, these places offer us a chance to rediscover the remarkable men and women who founded this nation and to recognize the relevance of not just what they did, but where they did it. The American Revolution: A Historical Guidebook takes readers to nearly 150 of these sites, providing an overview of the Revolution through an exploration of the places where American independence was articulated, fought for, and eventually secured. Beginning with the Boston Common, first occupied by British troops in 1768, and closing with Fraunces Tavern in New York, where George Washington bid farewell to his officers on December 4, 1783, Kennedy takes readers on a tour of the most significant places of Revolutionary history. Accompanied by illuminating excerpts and essays from some of the foremost scholars in the field, including David McCullough, Barbara Tuchman, David Hackett Fischer, Eric Foner, and John Ferling, the entries move in a roughly chronological order from the pre-Revolutionary years up through 1787. Taken together, the combination of site, essay, and excerpt provides rich context and overview, giving a sense of the major figures and events as well as the course of the Revolution, and cover topics ranging from the Boston Tea Party to the frontier wars. The guide is encyclopedic in scope and covers a wide geographical sweep. Accompanied by historical maps, as well as a number of illuminating primary documents including the Declaration of Independence and letters from John Adams and George Washington, it offers a comprehensive picture of how the Revolutionary War unfolded on American soil, and also points readers to the best writing on the subject in the last fifty years. The American Revolution: A Historical Guidebook is an essential companion for anyone interested in the story and history of our nation's founding.

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution


Author: Edward G. Gray,Jane Kamensky
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199746702
Category: History
Page: 673
View: 2090

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The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution introduces scholars, students and generally interested readers to the formative event in American history. In thirty-three individual essays, the Handbook provides readers with in-depth analysis of the Revolution's many sides.

A People s History of Poverty in America


Author: Stephen Pimpare
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595586962
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 8858

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In this compulsively readable social history, political scientist Stephen Pimpare vividly describes poverty from the perspective of poor and welfare-reliant Americans from the big city to the rural countryside. He focuses on how the poor have created community, secured shelter, and found food and illuminates their battles for dignity and respect. Through prodigious archival research and lucid analysis, Pimpare details the ways in which charity and aid for the poor have been inseparable, more often than not, from the scorn and disapproval of those who would help them. In the rich and often surprising historical testimonies he has collected from the poor in America, Pimpare overturns any simple conclusions about how the poor see themselves or what it feels like to be poor—and he shows clearly that the poor are all too often aware that charity comes with a price. It is that price that Pimpare eloquently questions in this book, reminding us through powerful anecdotes, some heart-wrenching and some surprisingly humorous, that poverty is not simply a moral failure.

William Blake and the Impossible History of the 1790s


Author: Saree Makdisi
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226502595
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 394
View: 4408

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Modern scholars often find it difficult to account for the profound eccentricities in the work of William Blake, dismissing them as either ahistorical or simply meaningless. But with this pioneering study, Saree Makdisi develops a reliable and comprehensive framework for understanding these peculiarities. According to Makdisi, Blake's poetry and drawings should compel us to reconsider the history of the 1790s. Tracing for the first time the many links among economics, politics, and religion in his work, Makdisi shows how Blake questioned and even subverted the commercial, consumerist, and political liberties that his contemporaries championed, all while developing his own radical aesthetic.

Martyr To Freedom

The Life and Death of Captain Daniel Drayton
Author: Zachary Martin
Publisher: Hamilton Books
ISBN: 0761854231
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 130
View: 2291

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Captain Daniel Drayton was an Atlantic coastal trader and abolitionist who led a life filled with ambition but afflicted by failure. This book explores his life and questions possible motives behind his tragic suicide in the summer of 1857 in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Grass Roots

A Commonsense Action Agenda for America
Author: Scott Hennen,Jim Denney
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781451608960
Category: Political Science
Page: 400
View: 6783

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Would you like to do your part in saving America? Grass Roots is a no-nonsense instruction manual that explains exactly what you can do. Scott Hennen—host and founder of the innovative Common Sense Club radio program—shows how everyday Americans just like you are making a difference for our country’s future. This down-to-earth handbook gives you clear, practical, effective actions you can take to preserve the American dream for your children and grandchildren. President Ronald Reagan once said, “All great change in America begins at the dinner table.” Today, most Americans struggle just to keep food on the dinner table. We are staggering under a crushing burden of big government, out-of-control spending, and towering federal debt. We have become tax slaves—and the people we sent to Washington to represent us are the very ones who sold us there. We’re angry—and rightly so. But ruling-class politicians have shrugged off our grassroots anger, calling it “Astroturf.” We’re tired of being ignored, patronized, and lied to by the very people who are supposed to be our “public servants.” Not since the original Boston Tea Party of 1773 have so many everyday Americans participated in such a significant display of righteous indignation and freedom-loving patriotism. For the first time in generations, ordinary hardworking, church-going Americans are carrying signs, gathering in large numbers, and making their voices heard. Big government, beware. A sleeping giant has awakened. Scott Hennen has drawn up a practical blueprint for change, a handbook for all of us who are ready to roll up our sleeves and do our part to restore America’s goodness—and greatness. Grass Roots is a political manifesto for every American who loves liberty and cares enough to get involved.

Freedom's Teacher, Enhanced Ebook

The Life of Septima Clark
Author: Katherine Mellen Charron
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807837601
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 480
View: 9039

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Civil rights activist Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987) developed a citizenship education program that enabled tens of thousands of African Americans to register to vote and to link the power of the ballot to concrete strategies for individual and communal empowerment. Clark, who began her own teaching career in 1916, grounded her approach in the philosophy and practice of southern black activist educators in the decades leading up to the 1950s and 1960s, and then trained a committed cadre of grassroots black women to lead this literacy revolution in community stores, beauty shops, and churches throughout the South. In this engaging biography, Katherine Charron tells the story of Clark, from her coming of age in the South Carolina lowcountry to her activism with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the movement's heyday. The enhanced electronic version of the book draws from archives, libraries, and the author's personal collection and includes nearly 100 letters, documents, photographs, newspaper articles, and interview excerpts, embedding each in the text where it will be most meaningful. Featuring more than 60 audio clips (more than 2.5 hours total) from oral history interviews with 15 individuals, including Clark herself, the enhanced e-book redefines the idea of the "talking book." Watch the video below to see a demonstration of the enhanced ebook:

Founders

The People Who Brought You a Nation
Author: Ray Raphael
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595585060
Category: History
Page: 640
View: 2727

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Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Hamilton, Adams, and Madison—together they are best known as an intimate cadre of daring, brilliant men credited with our nation’s founding. But does this group tell the whole story? In his widely praised new history of the roots of American patriotism, celebrated author Ray Raphael expands the historical canvas to reveal an entire generation of patriots who pushed for independence, fought a war, and set the United States on its course—giving us “an evangelizing introduction to the American Revolution” (Booklist) . Called “entertaining yet informative” by Library Journal , Founders brings to life seven historical figures whose stories anchor a sweeping yet intimate history of the Founding Era, from the beginnings of unrest in 1761 through the passage of the Bill of Rights thirty years later. Here we follow the intertwined lives of George Washington and a private soldier in his army. America’s richest merchant, who rescued the nation from bankruptcy, goes head to head with a peripatetic revolutionary who incited rebellion in seven states. Rounding out the company is a richly nuanced cast that includes a common village blacksmith, a conservative slave owner with an abolitionist son, and Mercy Otis Warren, the most politically engaged woman of the time. A master narrative with unprecedented historical scope, Founders will forever change our image of this most crucial moment in America’s past.

Contemporary Authors

A Bio-Bibliographical Guide to Current Writers in Fiction, General Nonfiction, Poetry, Journalism, Drama, Motion Pictures, Television, and Other Fields
Author: Thomson Gale
Publisher: Gale Cengage
ISBN: 9780787667047
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 452
View: 3259

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Your students and users will find biographical information on approximately 300 modern writers in this volume of Contemporary Authors® .

American Indians and African Americans of the American Revolution: Through Primary Sources


Author: John Micklos, Jr.
Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 0766041301
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 48
View: 7680

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"Examines the lives and roles of African Americans and American Indians during the American Revolution, including the difficulty of choosing sides in the war and fighting for the Americans and the British"--Provided by publisher.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 20: Social Class
Author: Larry J. Griffin,Peggy G. Hargis,Charles Reagan Wilson
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807882542
Category: Reference
Page: 528
View: 8113

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This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture offers a timely, authoritative, and interdisciplinary exploration of issues related to social class in the South from the colonial era to the present. With introductory essays by J. Wayne Flynt and by editors Larry J. Griffin and Peggy G. Hargis, the volume is a comprehensive, stand-alone reference to this complex subject, which underpins the history of the region and shapes its future. In 58 thematic essays and 103 topical entries, the contributors explore the effects of class on all aspects of life in the South--its role in Indian removal, the Civil War, the New Deal, and the civil rights movement, for example, and how it has been manifested in religion, sports, country and gospel music, and matters of gender. Artisans and the working class, indentured workers and steelworkers, the Freedmen's Bureau and the Knights of Labor are all examined. This volume provides a full investigation of social class in the region and situates class concerns at the center of our understanding of Southern culture.

Wild Yankees

The Struggle for Independence along Pennsylvania's Revolutionary Frontier
Author: Paul B. Moyer
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501700820
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 9671

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Northeast Pennsylvania's Wyoming Valley was truly a dark and bloody ground, the site of murders, massacres, and pitched battles. The valley's turbulent history was the product of a bitter contest over property and power known as the Wyoming controversy. This dispute, which raged between the mid-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, intersected with conflicts between whites and native peoples over land, a jurisdictional contest between Pennsylvania and Connecticut, violent contention over property among settlers and land speculators, and the social tumult of the American Revolution. In its later stages, the controversy pitted Pennsylvania and its settlers and speculators against "Wild Yankees"—frontier insurgents from New England who contested the state's authority and soil rights. In Wild Yankees, Paul B. Moyer argues that a struggle for personal independence waged by thousands of ordinary settlers lay at the root of conflict in northeast Pennsylvania and across the revolutionary-era frontier. The concept and pursuit of independence was not limited to actual war or high politics; it also resonated with ordinary people, such as the Wild Yankees, who pursued their own struggles for autonomy. This battle for independence drew settlers into contention with native peoples, wealthy speculators, governments, and each other over land, the shape of America's postindependence social order, and the meaning of the Revolution. With vivid descriptions of the various levels of this conflict, Moyer shows that the Wyoming controversy illuminates settlement, the daily lives of settlers, and agrarian unrest along the early American frontier.

Mr. President

How and Why the Founders Created a Chief Executive
Author: Ray Raphael
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307958566
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 1480

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The little-known story of the dramatic political maneuverings and personalities behind the creation of the office of the president, with ramifications that continue to this day. On June 1, 1787, when the Federal Convention first talked of establishing a new executive branch, James Wilson moved that “the Executive consist of a single person.” To us this might sound obvious, but not so at the time. Americans had just won their independence from an autocratic monarch, and they feared that a single leader might commandeer power or oppress citizens. Should the framers even flirt with one-man rule? For the first and only time that summer, there was silence. Not one of the loquacious delegates dared speak up. Eventually Benjamin Franklin rose, then others. James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and George Mason joined the debate, and for three months their deliberations continued. By early September the framers had made up their minds. A chief executive, the “president,” would be appointed by Congress to serve for seven years. He could not be reelected, and his powers were tightly constrained. He could neither negotiate treaties nor appoint Supreme Court justices and ambassadors. The Senate would do all that. Suddenly, less than two weeks before the convention adjourned, all this changed. How? And who made it happen? Enter Gouverneur Morris, the flamboyant, peg-legged hero of this saga, who pushed through his agenda with amazing political savvy and not a little bluster and deceit. For the first time, by focusing closely on the give-and-take of the convention’s dynamics, Ray Raphael reveals how politics and personalities cobbled together a lasting, but flawed, institution. Charting the presidency as it evolved during the administrations of Washington, Adams, and Jefferson, Raphael shows how, given the Constitution’s broad outlines, the president’s powers could easily be augmented but rarely diminished. Today we see the result—an office that has become more sweeping, more powerful, and more inherently partisan than the framers ever intended. And the issues of 1787—whether the Electoral College, the president’s war powers, or the extent of executive authority—continue to stir our political debates.

Soldiers' Revolution

Pennsylvanians in Arms and the Forging of Early American Identity
Author: Gregory T. Knouff
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 9780271047751
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: N.A
View: 5865

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The Ashgate Research Companion to Secession


Author: Professor Peter Radan,Dr Aleksandar Pavkovic
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409476529
Category: Political Science
Page: 592
View: 7502

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This research companion has three complementary aims. First, to offer an overview of the current theoretical approaches to secession in the social sciences, international relations, legal theory, political theory and applied ethics. Second, to outline the current practice of international recognition of secession and current domestic and international laws which regulate secession. Third, to offer an account of major secessionist movements - past and present - from a comparative perspective.