A New History of Modern Architecture


Author: Colin Davies
Publisher: Laurence King Publishing
ISBN: 9781786270566
Category: Architecture
Page: 496
View: 1806

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Combining a fascinating, thought-provoking and – above all – readable text with over 800 photographs, plans, and sections, this exciting new reading of modern architecture is a must for students and architecture enthusiasts alike. Organized largely as a chronology, chapters necessarily overlap to allow for the discrete examination of key themes including typologies, movements, and biographical studies, as well as the impact of evolving technology and country-specific influences.

A Concise History of Modern Architecture in India


Author: Jon T. Lang
Publisher: Orient Blackswan
ISBN: 9788178240176
Category: Architecture
Page: 205
View: 3830

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In Lucid Language That Speaks To Laymen And Architects Alike, This Book Provides A History Of Twentieth Century Architecture In India. It Examines In Detail The Early Influences On Indian Architecture Both Of Movements Like The Bauhaus As Well As Prominent Individuals Like Habib Rehman, Jawaharlal Nehru, Frank Lloyd Wright And Le Corbusier.

Modern Architecture

A Critical History
Author: Kenneth Frampton
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780500203958
Category: Architecture
Page: 424
View: 1272

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This acclaimed survey of modern architecture and its origins has become a classic since it first appeared in 1980. For this fourth edition Kenneth Frampton has added a major new chapter that explores the effects of globalization on architecture in recent years, the rise annd rise of the celebrity architect, and the way in which practices worldwide have addressed such issues as sustainability and habitat. The bibliography has also been updated and expanded, making this volume more complete and indispensable than ever.

Modern Architecture


Author: Alan Colquhoun
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0192842269
Category: Architecture
Page: 287
View: 9795

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Eminent scholar Alan Colquhoun provides a fascinating analysis of international modernism in the world of architecture, and the complex motivations behind this revolutionary movement. Exploring the evolution of the movement from Art Nouveau in the 1890s to the megastructures of the 1960s, Colquhoun assesses the triumphs and failures of the era, along with the movement's main architects and their roles as acknowledged masters.

History of Modern Architecture


Author: Leonardo Benevolo
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780262520461
Category: Architecture, Modern
Page: 907
View: 2449

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Let it be said at once that the format of this work is richly handsome: it is a two-volume boxed set comprising 844 pages and well over 1,000 high-quality illustrations, and it reflects throughout its publisher's conviction that good design is an essential, not superficial, part of bookmaking. Beyond that, it should be emphasized that this work is not another facile cultural tour of modern architecture. It is a serious and original study of the beginnings and development of modernism in which the pictorial aspects are designed to aid in the communication of the author's closely reasoned formulations, rather than to gloss over a lack of substantive content. The book is a translation of the third Italian edition, published in 1966. Benevolo, who is on the faculty of architecture in Venice, has earned an international reputation as a historian of architecture and town planning, and his publications embrace the span of time from the Renaissance to the foreseeable future. One such publication, The Origins of Modern Town Planning(The MIT Press, 1967), may be read as a prelude to the present work as well as an independent contribution. Perhaps more than any other architectural historian in our time, Benevolo has made a determined effort to place developments in design and planning in their proper social and political settings. Indeed, the author argues that the development of the modern movement in architecture was determined, not by aesthetic formalisms, but largely by the social changes that have occurred since about 1760: "After the middle of the eighteenth century, without the continuity of formal activity being in any way broken, indeed while architectural language seems to be acquiring a particular coherence, the relations between architect and society began to change radically.... New material and spiritual needs, new ideas and modes of procedure arise both within and beyond the traditional limits, and finally they run together to form a new architectural synthesis that is completely different from the old one. In this way it is possible to explain the birth of modern architecture, which otherwise would seem completely incomprehensible...." This first volume provides the work with its solid historical roots. It describes the component parts of modern architectural thought, discovers their origins in the various fields in which they arose, and follows their convergence from 1760 to 1914. The author traces the physical events that gave birth to the modern European city through 1890 and discusses in particular the influences that led to the thought of Owen, Ruskin, and Morris. He next explains why certain urban experiments took place in America earlier than in Europe, and he ends the volume with a discussion of European avant-gardemovements between 1890 and 1914. Benevolo remarks at one point, "When one talks about modern architecture one must bear in mind the fact that it implies not only a new range of forms, but also a new way of thinking, whose consequences have not yet all been calculated." His main concern is to provide a more exact calculation of those consequences.

White Walls, Designer Dresses

The Fashioning of Modern Architecture
Author: Mark Wigley
Publisher: Mit Press
ISBN: 9780262731454
Category: Architecture
Page: 424
View: 3221

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In a daring revisionist history of modern architecture, Mark Wigley opens up a new understanding of the historical avant-garde. He explores the most obvious, but least discussed, feature of modern architecture: white walls. Although the white wall exemplifies the stripping away of the decorative masquerade costumes worn by nineteenth-century buildings, Wigley argues that modern buildings are not naked. The white wall is itself a form of clothing--the newly athletic body of the building, like that of its occupants, wears a new kind of garment and these garments are meant to match. Not only did almost all modern architects literally design dresses, Wigley points out, their arguments for a modern architecture were taken from the logic of clothing reform. Architecture was understood as a form of dress design. Wigley follows the trajectory of this key subtext by closely reading the statements and designs of most of the protagonists, demonstrating that it renders modern architecture's relationship with the psychosexual economy of fashion much more ambiguous than the architects' endlessly repeated rejections of fashion would suggest. Indeed, Wigley asserts, the very intensity of these rejections is a symptom of how deeply they are embedded in the world of clothing. By drawing on arguments about the relationship between clothing and architecture first formulated in the middle of the nineteenth century, modern architects in fact presented a sophisticated theory of the surface, modernizing architecture by transforming the status of the surface. White Walls, Designer Dresses shows how this seemingly incidental clothing logic actually organizes the detailed design of the modern building, dictating a system of polychromy, understood as a multicolored outfit. The familiar image of modern architecture as white turns out to be the effect of a historiographical tradition that has worked hard to suppress the color of the surfaces of the buildings that it describes. Wigley analyzes this suppression in terms of the sexual logic that invariably accompanies discussions of clothing and color, recovering those sensuously colored surfaces and the extraordinary arguments about clothing that were used to defend them.

Colonialism and Modern Architecture in Germany


Author: Itohan Osayimwese
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
ISBN: 0822982919
Category: Architecture
Page: 352
View: 8108

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Over the course of the nineteenth century, drastic social and political changes, technological innovations, and exposure to non-Western cultures affected Germany’s built environment in profound ways. The economic challenges of Germany’s colonial project forced architects designing for the colonies to abandon a centuries-long, highly ornamental architectural style in favor of structural technologies and building materials that catered to the local contexts of its remote colonies, such as prefabricated systems. As German architects gathered information about the regions under their influence in Africa, Asia, and the Pacific—during expeditions, at international exhibitions, and from colonial entrepreneurs and officials—they published their findings in books and articles and organized lectures and exhibits that stimulated progressive architectural thinking and shaped the emerging modern language of architecture within Germany itself. Offering in-depth interpretations across the fields of architectural history and postcolonial studies, Itohan Osayimwese considers the effects of colonialism, travel, and globalization on the development of modern architecture in Germany from the 1850s until the 1930s. Since architectural developments in nineteenth-century Germany are typically understood as crucial to the evolution of architecture worldwide in the twentieth century, this book globalizes the history of modern architecture at its founding moment.

Makers of Modern Architecture


Author: Martin Filler
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 9781590172278
Category: Architecture
Page: 323
View: 4668

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Profiles notable twentieth-century architects, including Frank Lloyd Wright, Charles and Ray Eames, and Frank Gehry.

Oral History of Modern Architecture

Interviews with the Greatest Architects of the Twentieth Century
Author: John Peter
Publisher: Harry N. Abrams
ISBN: 9780810927469
Category: Architecture
Page: 320
View: 6798

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Offers extensive interviews with more than 60 of the master builders of modern times & comes packaged with a full-length compact disc, which lets us hear renowned architects, in their own voices.

The Emergence of Modern Architecture

A Documentary History from 1000 to 1810
Author: Liane Lefaivre,Alexander Tzonis
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415260244
Category: Architecture
Page: 533
View: 9404

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"In this book Liane Lefaivre and Alexander Tzonis bring together 140 documents spanning a period from the year 1000 to the end of the eighteenth century. They argue that Modern Architectural thinking was created during this period, a wholly new forma mentis for conceiving buildings, landscapes, and cities. The material includes, in addition to the more predictable texts, key extracts from architectural treatises, handbooks, and textbooks, material from letters, articles from the press of the times, scientific memoirs, maxims, poems, plays, and novels. Their authors are equally varied architects, patrons, politicians, artists, poets, scientists, priests, philosophers, and journalists. Some describe and systematize, some argue and criticize, and a large number are eager to present new findings and new ways to construe and construct the world.".

The New Old House

Historic and Modern Architecture Combined
Author: Marc Kristal
Publisher: ABRAMS
ISBN: 9781419724046
Category: Architecture
Page: 240
View: 4928

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The New Old House presents 18 private historic homes, from North America to Europe, and traces the ingenious ways architects have revitalized and refreshed them for a new generation. Most of the renovations occurred in the last decade, but all of the homes have origins reaching back into the past, in some cases hundreds of years. Projects and firms featured include Greenwich House, Allan Greenberg; Longbranch, Jim Olson; Astley Castle, Witherford Watson Mann; Hunsett Mill, Acme; Cotswolds House, Richard Found; plus more than a dozen others. These projects address such timely factors as sustainability, multiculturalism, preservation, and style, and demonstrate the unique beauty and elegance that comes from the interweaving of modernity and history.

Exploding the Myths of Modern Architecture


Author: Malcolm Millais
Publisher: Frances Lincoln Limited
ISBN: 9780711229747
Category: Architecture
Page: 296
View: 2781

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The Modern movement began in the 1920s when a small group of young architects felt all that had gone before should be rejected and that architectural design should start afresh. This fresh start, they declared, should be based on modern technology and a new, modern approach to life. Their innovations became the 20th century’s dominant movement in architecture, crystallizing into the international style of the 1920s and '30s. In Exploding the Myths of Modern Architecture, Malcolm Millais explores the forces and factors that led to the emergence of the Modern movement, arguing that it was based on completely false premises. Millais offers a rarely heard perspective on the Modern movement, explaining its failures and how the well-meaning "revolutionaries” behind it gained and maintained power.

Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture, 1750-1950


Author: Peter Collins
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 9780773517752
Category: Architecture
Page: 308
View: 5608

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Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture revolutionized the understanding of modernism in architecture, pushing back the sense of its origin from the early twentieth century to the 1750s and thus placing architectural thought within the a broader context of Western intellectual history. This new edition of Peter Collins's ground-breaking study includes all seventy-two illustrations of the hard cover original edition, which has been out of print since 1967, and restores the large format.

History of Modern Architecture


Author: Leonardo Benevolo
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262520454
Category: Architecture
Page: 868
View: 5932

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Let it be said at once that the format of this work is richly handsome: it is atwo-volume boxed set comprising 844 pages and well over 1,000 high-quality illustrations, and itreflects throughout its publisher's conviction that good design is an essential, not superficial,part of bookmaking.Beyond that, it should be emphasized that this work is not another facilecultural tour of modern architecture. It is a serious and original study of the beginnings anddevelopment of modernism in which the pictorial aspects are designed to aid in the communication ofthe author's closely reasoned formulations, rather than to gloss over a lack of substantivecontent.The book is a translation of the third Italian edition, published in 1966. Benevolo, who ison the faculty of architecture in Venice, has earned an international reputation as a historian ofarchitecture and town planning, and his publications embrace the span of time from the Renaissanceto the foreseeable future. One such publication, The Origins of Modern Town Planning (The MIT Press,1967), may be read as a prelude to the present work as well as an independent contribution. Perhapsmore than any other architectural historian in our time, Benevolo has made a determined effort toplace developments in design and planning in their proper social and political settings.Indeed, theauthor argues that the development of the modern movement in architecture was determined, not byaesthetic formalisms, but largely by the social changes that have occurred since about 1760: "Afterthe middle of the eighteenth century, without the continuity of formal activity being in any waybroken, indeed while architectural language seems to be acquiring a particular coherence, therelations between architect and society began to change radically.... New material and spiritualneeds, new ideas and modes of procedure arise both within and beyond the traditional limits, andfinally they run together to form a new architectural synthesis that is completely different fromthe old one. In this way it is possible to explain the birth of modern architecture, which otherwisewould seem completely incomprehensible...."This second volume is concerned with the modern movementproper, from 1914 to 1966. The author emphasizes the unity of the movement, rejecting the usualtreatment that allots to the individual architects separate and unconnected biographicalaccounts.Benevolo remarks at one point, "When one talks about modern architecture one must bear inmind the fact that it implies not only a new range of forms, but also a new way of thinking, whoseconsequences have not yet all been calculated." His main concern is to provide a more exactcalculation of those consequences.

Modern Architecture in Mexico City

History, Representation, and the Shaping of a Capital
Author: Kathryn E. O'Rourke
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
ISBN: 0822981629
Category: Architecture
Page: 368
View: 2294

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Mexico City became one of the centers of architectural modernism in the Americas in the first half of the twentieth century. Invigorated by insights drawn from the first published histories of Mexican colonial architecture, which suggested that Mexico possessed a distinctive architecture and culture, beginning in the 1920s a new generation of architects created profoundly visual modern buildings intended to convey Mexico’s unique cultural character. By midcentury these architects and their students had rewritten the country’s architectural history and transformed the capital into a metropolis where new buildings that evoked pre-conquest, colonial, and International Style architecture coexisted. Through an exploration of schools, a university campus, a government ministry, a workers’ park, and houses for Diego Rivera and Luis Barragán, Kathryn O’Rourke offers a new interpretation of modern architecture in the Mexican capital, showing close links between design, evolving understandings of national architectural history, folk art, and social reform. This book demonstrates why creating a distinctively Mexican architecture captivated architects whose work was formally dissimilar, and how that concern became central to the profession.

The Meaning of Modern Architecture

Its Inner Necessity and an Empathetic Reading
Author: Dr Hans Rudolf Morgenthaler
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1472453018
Category: Architecture
Page: 158
View: 6365

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Using empathy, as established by the Vienna School of Art History, complemented by insights on how the mind processes visual stimuli, as demonstrated by late 19th-century psychologists and art theorists, this book puts forward an innovative interpretative method of decoding the forms and spaces of Modern buildings. It proposes that Modern architecture is too diverse to be reduced to a few common formal or ornamental features. Instead, by relying on the viewer’s innate psycho-physiological perceptive abilities, the sensual and intuitive understandings of composition, form, and space are emphasized.

Thinking About Architecture

An Introduction to Architectural Theory
Author: Colin Davies
Publisher: Laurence King Pub
ISBN: N.A
Category: Architecture
Page: 160
View: 5585

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The aim of the book is to provide teachers, students, practising architects and curious readers with a set of ideas that will enrich their conversation, their writing, and above all their thinking about architecture.It's divided into eight chapters, each covering a particular aspect of architecture, and introduces difficult concepts gradually.

Luxury and Modernism

Architecture and the Object in Germany 1900-1933
Author: Robin Schuldenfrei
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400890489
Category: Architecture
Page: 336
View: 1030

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This beautifully illustrated book provides a new interpretation of modern architecture and design in Germany during the heyday of the Bauhaus and the Werkbund, tracing modernism's lasting allure to its many manifestations of luxury. Robin Schuldenfrei casts the work of legendary figures such as Peter Behrens, Walter Gropius, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in an entirely different light, revealing the complexities and contradictions inherent to modernism's promotion and consumption. Luxury and Modernism shows how luxury was present in bold, literal forms in modern designs--from lavish materials and costly technologies to deluxe buildings and household objects—and in subtler ways as well, such as social milieus and modes of living. While modernism was publicized as a fusion of technology, new materials, and rational aesthetics to improve the lives of ordinary people, it was often out of reach to the very masses it purportedly served. Schuldenfrei exposes the disconnect between modernism's utopian discourse and its luxury objects and elite architectural commissions. Despite the movement's egalitarian rhetoric, many modern designs addressed the desires of the privileged individual. Yet as Schuldenfrei demonstrates, luxury was integral not only to how modern buildings and objects were designed, manufactured, and sold, but has contributed to modernism's appeal to this day. Featuring stunning color images throughout, Luxury and Modernism provides an entirely new look at one of the most celebrated and influential eras in the history of architecture.