A Life in Writing

The Story of an American Journalist
Author: Charles Champlin
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
ISBN: 9780815608479
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 203
View: 5764

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"Balancing self-portrait with historical narrative, Champlin presents a story of self-discovery in the larger context of a changing world. Relying on retrospection and personal and professional experience, he recalls crucial moments during WWII, the postwar years, and the sixties, reflections that will resonate with many readers."--BOOK JACKET.

The Columbia Guide to the Latin American Novel Since 1945


Author: Raymond L. Williams
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231501692
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 400
View: 8957

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In this expertly crafted, richly detailed guide, Raymond Leslie Williams explores the cultural, political, and historical events that have shaped the Latin American and Caribbean novel since the end of World War II. In addition to works originally composed in English, Williams covers novels written in Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, and Haitian Creole, and traces the profound influence of modernization, revolution, and democratization on the writing of this era. Beginning in 1945, Williams introduces major trends by region, including the Caribbean and U.S. Latino novel, the Mexican and Central American novel, the Andean novel, the Southern Cone novel, and the novel of Brazil. He discusses the rise of the modernist novel in the 1940s, led by Jorge Luis Borges's reaffirmation of the right of invention, and covers the advent of the postmodern generation of the 1990s in Brazil, the Generation of the "Crack" in Mexico, and the McOndo generation in other parts of Latin America. An alphabetical guide offers biographies of authors, coverage of major topics, and brief introductions to individual novels. It also addresses such areas as women's writing, Afro-Latin American writing, and magic realism. The guide's final section includes an annotated bibliography of introductory studies on the Latin American and Caribbean novel, national literary traditions, and the work of individual authors. From early attempts to synthesize postcolonial concerns with modernist aesthetics to the current focus on urban violence and globalization, The Columbia Guide to the Latin American Novel Since 1945 presents a comprehensive, accessible portrait of a thoroughly diverse and complex branch of world literature.

Cambridge Cultural History of Britain: Volume 9, Modern Britain


Author: Boris Ford
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521428897
Category: Art
Page: 362
View: 8834

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This book is a comprehensive survey for students, specialists and general readers of all major branches of the arts in early Britain. It also reveals the cultural and social setting in which writers, musicians, architects and other artists of the period worked.

The L.M. Montgomery Reader

Volume One: A Life in Print
Author: Benjamin Lefebvre
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442668571
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 464
View: 3575

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The L.M. Montgomery Reader assembles significant rediscovered primary material on one of Canada’s most enduringly popular authors throughout her high-profile career and after her death. Each of its three volumes gathers pieces published all over the world to set the stage for a much-needed reassessment of Montgomery’s literary reputation. Much of the material is freshly unearthed from archives and digital collections and has never before been published in book form. The selections appearing in this first volume focus on Montgomery’s role as a public celebrity and author of the resoundingly successful Anne of Green Gables (1908). They give a strong impression of her as a writer and cultural critic as she discusses a range of topics with wit, wisdom, and humour, including the natural landscape of Prince Edward Island, her wide readership, anxieties about modernity, and the continued relevance of “old ideals.” These essays and interviews, joined by a number of additional pieces that discuss her work’s literary and cultural value in relation to an emerging canon of Canadian literature, make up nearly one hundred selections in all. Each volume is accompanied by an extensive introduction and detailed commentary by leading Montgomery scholar Benjamin Lefebvre that trace the interplay between the author and the critic, as well as between the private and the public Montgomery. This volume – and the Reader as a whole – adds tremendously to our understanding and appreciation of Montgomery’s legacy as a Canadian author and as a literary celebrity both during and beyond her lifetime.

The Classic American Short Story MEGAPACK ® (Volume 1)

34 of the Greatest Stories Ever Written
Author: Ambrose Bierce,Stephen Crane,Mark Twain,Bret Harte,Edgar Allan Poe,Washington Irving,O. Henry,Jack London,James Fenimore Cooper,Sherwood Anderson
Publisher: Wildside Press LLC
ISBN: 1434447081
Category: Fiction
Page: 621
View: 4459

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The Classic American Short Story Megapack (Volume 1) assembles 34 of the greatest stories ever written by American authors -- including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, Ambrose Bierce, Edgar Allan Poe, Bret Harte, Sherwood Anderson, Mark Twain, O. Henry, Jack London, and Stephen Crane. Includes multiple stories per author, their most famous short works, along with biographical notes. Complete contents: YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN, by Nathaniel Hawthorne THE CELESTIAL RAILROAD, by Nathaniel Hawthorne THE GREAT STONE FACE, by Nathaniel Hawthorne ETHAN BRAND, by Nathaniel Hawthorne RIP VAN WINKLE, by Washington Irving THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW, by Washington Irving AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A POCKET-HANDKERCHIEF by James Fenimore Cooper THE DAMNED THING, by Ambrose Bierce AN OCCURRENCE AT OWL CREEK, by Ambrose Bierce THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER, by Edgar Allan Poe THE CASK OF AMONTILLADO, by Edgar Allan Poe THE PURLOINED LETTER, by Edgar Allan Poe THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM, by Edgar Allan Poe THE PREMATURE BURIAL, by Edgar Allan Poe THE MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE, by Edgar Allan Poe THE LUCK OF ROARING CAMP, by Bret Harte THE OUTCASTS OF POKER FLAT, by Bret Hartev HANDS, by Sherwood Anderson I’M A FOOL, by Sherwood Anderson THE MAN THAT CORRUPTED HADLEYBURG, by Mark Twain THE CELEBRATED JUMPING FROG OF CALAVERAS COUNTY, by Mark Twain THE GIFT OF THE MAGI, by O. Henry THE RANSOM OF RED CHIEF, by O. Henry THE COP AND THE ANTHEM, by O. Henry A RETRIEVED REFORMATION, by O. Henry THE DUPLICITY OF HARGRAVES, by O. Henry TO BUILD A FIRE, by Jack London AN ODYSSEY OF THE NORTH, by Jack London LOVE OF LIFE, by Jack London THE HEATHEN, by Jack London THE PEARLS OF PARLAY, by Jack London THE BRIDE COMES TO YELLOW SKY, by Stephen Crane THE MONSTER, by Stephen Crane THE BLUE HOTEL, by Stephen Crane And don't forget to search your favorite ebook store for Megapack to see the other great entries in this series -- covering science fiction, fantasy, horror, mysteries, westerns, children's literature, and much, much more!

Journalism and Realism

Rendering American Life
Author: Thomas B. Connery
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 0810127334
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 281
View: 2506

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"Both newspaper and magazine journalism in the nineteenth century fully participated in the development and emergence of American realism in the arts, which attempted to portray everyday life accurately, especially in fiction. In photographs and artists' sketches as well as news articles and features, journalists exposed the stories and conditions that became the material for American realism, and they were also its early and vocal advocates. This relationship peaked from 1890 to 1910, when writers who might be called the first literary journalists closed the circle by more fully adopting the fiction writer's style of attempting to 'show the reader real life, ' as their literary progeny Tom Wolfe would put it many years later."--Page 4 of cover.

Jennie Carter

A Black Journalist of the Early West
Author: Jennie Carter,Eric Gardner
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781604733136
Category: African American women journalists
Page: 153
View: 2491

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In June 1867, the San Francisco Elevator -one of the nation\'s premier black weekly newspapers during Reconstruction-began publishing articles by a Californian calling herself \Ann J. Trask\ and later \Semper Fidelis.\ Her name was Jennie Carter (1830-1881), and the Elevator would print her essays, columns, and poems for seven years. Carter probably spent her early life in New Orleans, New York, and Wisconsin, but by the time she wrote her \Always Faithful\ columns for the newspaper, she was in Nevada County, California. Her work considers California and national politics, race and racism, women\'s rights and suffrage, temperance, morality, education, and a host of other issues, all from the point of view of an unabashedly strong-minded African American woman. Recovering Carter\'s work from obscurity, this volume re-presents one of the most exciting bodies of extant work by an African American journalist before the twentieth century. Editor Eric Gardner provides an introduction that documents as much of Carter\'s life in California as can be known and places her work in historical and lite-rary context. Eric Gardner is chair and professor of English at Saginaw Valley State University. He is the editor of Major Voices: The Drama of Slavery, and his work has appeared in African American Review, the African American National Biography, and Legacy .

Into the Valley

Marines at Guadalcanal
Author: John Hersey
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803273283
Category: History
Page: 79
View: 8999

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John Hersey (1914?93) was a correspondent for Time and Life magazines when in 1942 he was sent to cover Guadalcanal, the largest of the Solomon Islands in the Western Pacific. While there, Hersey observed a small battle upon which Into the Valley is based. While the battle itself was not of great significance, Hersey gives insightful details concerning the jungle environment, recounts conversations among the men before, during, and after battle, and describes how the wounded were evacuated as well as other works of daily heroism.

A Voice in the Box

My Life in Radio
Author: Bob Edwards
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813140455
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 236
View: 8167

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The host of The Bob Edwards Show and Bob Edwards Weekend on Sirius XM Radio, Bob Edwards became the first radio personality with a large national audience to take his chances in the new field of satellite radio. The programs' mix of long-form interviews and news documentaries has won many prestigious awards. For thirty years, Louisville native Edwards was the voice of National Public Radio's daily newsmagazine programs, co-hosting All Things Considered before launching Morning Edition in 1979. These programs built NPR's national audience while also bringing Edwards to national prominence. In 2004, however, NPR announced that it would be finding a replacement for Edwards, inciting protests from tens of thousands of his fans and controversy among his listeners and fellow broadcasters. Today, Edwards continues to inform the American public with a voice known for its sincerity, intelligence, and wit. In A Voice in the Box: My Life in Radio, Edwards recounts his career as one of the most important figures in modern broadcasting. He describes his road to success on the radio waves, from his early days knocking on station doors during college and working for American Forces Korea Network to his work at NPR and induction into the National Radio Hall of Fame in 2004. Edwards tells the story of his exit from NPR and the launch of his new radio ventures on the XM Satellite Radio network. Throughout the book, his sharp observations about the people he interviewed and covered and the colleagues with whom he worked offer a window on forty years of American news and on the evolution of public journalism. A Voice in the Box is an insider's account of the world of American media and a fascinating, personal narrative from one of the most iconic personalities in radio history.

Fear and Loathing in America

The Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist
Author: Hunter S. Thompson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439126364
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 784
View: 7135

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From the king of “Gonzo” journalism and bestselling author who brought you Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas comes another astonishing volume of letters by Hunter S. Thompson. Brazen, incisive, and outrageous as ever, this second volume of Thompson’s private correspondence is the highly anticipated follow-up to The Proud Highway. When that first book of letters appeared in 1997, Time pronounced it "deliriously entertaining"; Rolling Stone called it "brilliant beyond description"; and The New York Times celebrated its "wicked humor and bracing political conviction." Spanning the years between 1968 and 1976, these never-before-published letters show Thompson building his legend: running for sheriff in Aspen, Colorado; creating the seminal road book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas; twisting political reporting to new heights for Rolling Stone; and making sense of it all in the landmark Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72. To read Thompson's dispatches from these years—addressed to the author's friends, enemies, editors, and creditors, and such notables as Jimmy Carter, Tom Wolfe, and Kurt Vonnegut—is to read a raw, revolutionary eyewitness account of one of the most exciting and pivotal eras in American history.

Latin American Mystery Writers

An A-to-Z Guide
Author: Darrell B. Lockhart
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313305542
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 225
View: 7911

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Alphabetically arranged entries cover the lives and works of 54 Latin American mystery writers.

Buried Alive

The True Story of Kidnapping, Captivity, and a Dramatic Rescue (NelsonFree)
Author: Roy Hallums
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
ISBN: 1418584150
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 4966

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A true-life adventure sure to shock as well as inspire. AK47s, masked thugs, and brutal urgency erupt from Roy Hallums' account of his abduction in Iraq, shredding through those frequently sterile cable news reports revealing that another "American contractor is being held hostage . . ." Hallums was the everyman behind that report?a 56-year-old retired Naval commander working as a food supply contractor in Baghdad's high-end Mansour District. His abduction was transacted in a matter of minutes, amidst a hail of gunfire and a handful of casualties. For the first few months of his captivity, Hallums endured beatings and psychological torture while being shuffled from one ramshackle safe house to another. From the four-foot-tall crawlspace where he carried out the bulk of his nearly year-long abduction, Hallums established a surprising degree of normalcy?a system of routines and timekeeping, along with an attention to the particulars that defined his horrific ordeal. His experience is recreated here, rich with harrowing specifics and surprising observations.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 9: Literature
Author: M. Thomas Inge
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469616645
Category: Reference
Page: 536
View: 8584

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Offering a comprehensive view of the South's literary landscape, past and present, this volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture celebrates the region's ever-flourishing literary culture and recognizes the ongoing evolution of the southern literary canon. As new writers draw upon and reshape previous traditions, southern literature has broadened and deepened its connections not just to the American literary mainstream but also to world literatures--a development thoughtfully explored in the essays here. Greatly expanding the content of the literature section in the original Encyclopedia, this volume includes 31 thematic essays addressing major genres of literature; theoretical categories, such as regionalism, the southern gothic, and agrarianism; and themes in southern writing, such as food, religion, and sexuality. Most striking is the fivefold increase in the number of biographical entries, which introduce southern novelists, playwrights, poets, and critics. Special attention is given to contemporary writers and other individuals who have not been widely covered in previous scholarship.

Stewart Parker

A Life
Author: Marilynn Richtarik
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191655171
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 448
View: 1148

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Born in Belfast during World War II, raised in a working-class Protestant family, and educated on scholarship at Queen's University, writer Stewart Parker's story is in many ways the story of his generation. Other aspects of his personal history, though, such as the amputation of his left leg at age 19, helped to create an extraordinarily perceptive observer and commentator. Steeped in American popular culture as a child and young adult, he spent five years teaching in the United States before returning to Belfast in August 1969, the same week British troops responded to sectarian disturbances there. Parker had developed a sense of writing as a form of political action in the highly charged atmosphere of the US in the late 1960s, which he applied in many and varied capacities throughout the worst years of the Troubles to express his own socialist and secular vision of Northern Irish potential. As a young aspiring poet and novelist, he supported himself with free-lance work that brought him into contact with institutions ranging from BBC Northern Ireland to the Irish Times (for which he wrote personal columns and the music review feature High Pop) and from the Queen's University Extramural Department to Long Kesh internment camp (where his creative writing students included Gerry Adams). It is as a playwright, however, that Parker earned a permanent spot in the literary canon with drama that encapsulates his experience of Northern Ireland in the 1970s. Marilynn Richtarik's Stewart Parker: A Life illuminates the genesis, development, and meaning of such classic plays as Spokesong, Northern Star, and Pentecost - works that continue to shed light on the North's past, present, and future - in the context of Parker's life and times. Meticulously researched and engagingly written, this critical biography rewards general readers and specialists alike.

Maiden Tribute

A Life of W.T. Stead
Author: Grace Eckley
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1462838111
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 464
View: 7639

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Maiden Tribute: A Life of W. T. Stead This journalist who communicated with his Senior Partner instantaneously, whose ecumenical advance beyond his epoch still startles his readers, throughout his life retained his Whitmanesque individualism and rugged speech. W. T. Stead frequently scoffed at the Anglican Sunday prayers that instructed God how to direct the affairs of the world. If God did not comply, it was not for want of pious instruction. Anglicans were wanting, and most of his late Victorian-Edwardian world was Anglican. W. T. Stead (1849-1912) was a Nonconforrmist with and without the capital n. Had he been born with a wooden spoon in his mouth, it meant only that God needed his help to make the world silver. He never ceased to believe the world could be made silver, for mankind in general was anonymously, even though sluggishly, contributing to the infinite ascending spiral traced by the finger of God between the universe and the ideal. Clearly, the position of women in the 1870s was far from the ideal, remote from the privileges selfishly guarded by men. Taking a cue from his mother who campaigned against the Contagious Diseases Actswhich punished women but not men for transmitting syphilishe determined to bring women nearer the honors of Mary the Mother and Mary the Magdalen, for these two women stand out against the gloom of the past radiant as the angels of God, and yet the true ideals of the womanhood of the world. Such appeared implausible. Everywhere he saw in the streets wretched ruins of humanity, women stamped and crushed into devils by society . . . . And the children nursed in debauchery, suckled in crime, predestined to a life of misery and shame! Mrs. Josephine Butler already knew that Britains leadership would not assist: in the grandest house of the kind in Paris, are to be seen portraits of all the great men who had frequented themdiplomatists, generals, and English Lords . . . . The brothel-keeper put a cross underneath the portrait at each visit, to mark the number of visits made to the house by these great men! Before he visited London, the export of English girls for State-regulated prostitution in Brussels imposed upon Stead a sense that he was destined to write an Uncle Toms Cabin on The Slavery of Europe. The burden is greater than I can bear. But if it is ultimately to be laid on my back, God will strengthen me for it. If I have to write it I shall have to plunge into the depths of the social hell, and that is impossible outside a great city. Even high-minded seekers of justice found the social hell a place they could not venture into. Initiating research for The Maiden Tribute of Modern Babylon, Stead took counsel with civic powers Lord Carnarvon, John Morley, Arthur Balfour, Henry Labouchere among others, and Sir Charles Russell, who declined an invitation to see for himself because as leader of the English Bar he could not play the rle of a detective in a house of ill-fame. As the shocking series of four daily exposes neared its close, why others had not done Steads work was explained by Benjamin Scott, the City Chamberlain who had prompted Stead to take up the cause: We had not the ability or the opportunity that Stead possessed, and lacked the courage. Stead had begun the Maiden Tribute with a complaint against British society, that chivalry was dead and Christianity effete. Benjamin Waugh praised him after the fact: The spirit of both survives in you to-day. Stead accomplished his goal: passage of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, still in force today. Why the British sent him to jail for passing the first child protection law is graced with the word technicality. Branded both a saint and a filthy ex-convict, Stead continued to use his journalistic strength to achieve justice for citizens; in the 1890s he turned to internationalism. Lobbying for arbitration for settling international disputes, he crafted a memorial calling for li

Dictionary of Literature in English


Author: Neil King,Sarah King
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9781579583811
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 189
View: 7852

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While white racism has global dimensions, it has an unshakeable lease on life in South African political organizations and its educational system. Donnarae MacCann and Yulisa Maddy here provide a thorough and provocative analysis of South African children's literature during the key decade around Nelson Mandela's release from prison. Their research demonstrates that the literature of this period was derived from the same milieu -- intellectual, educational, religious, political, and economic -- that brought white supremacy to South Africa during colonial times. This volume is a signal contribution to the study of children's literature and its relation to racism and social conditions.

The Life You Save May Be Your Own

An American Pilgrimage
Author: Paul Elie
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1429923954
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 576
View: 4097

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The story of four modern American Catholics who made literature out of their search for God In the mid-twentieth century four American Catholics came to believe that the best way to explore the questions of religious faith was to write about them-in works that readers of all kinds could admire. The Life You Save May Be Your Own is their story-a vivid and enthralling account of great writers and their power over us. Thomas Merton was a Trappist monk in Kentucky; Dorothy Day the founder of the Catholic Worker in New York; Flannery O'Connor a "Christ-haunted" literary prodigy in Georgia; Walker Percy a doctor in New Orleans who quit medicine to write fiction and philosophy. A friend came up with a name for them-the School of the Holy Ghost-and for three decades they exchanged letters, ardently read one another's books, and grappled with what one of them called a "predicament shared in common." A pilgrimage is a journey taken in light of a story; and in The Life You Save May Be Your Own Paul Elie tells these writers' story as a pilgrimage from the God-obsessed literary past of Dante and Dostoevsky out into the thrilling chaos of postwar American life. It is a story of how the Catholic faith, in their vision of things, took on forms the faithful could not have anticipated. And it is a story about the ways we look to great books and writers to help us make sense of our experience, about the power of literature to change-to save-our lives.

Revolutionary War (ENHANCED eBook)


Author: Tim McNeese
Publisher: Lorenz Educational Press
ISBN: 1429109890
Category: History
Page: 112
View: 2874

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“The Revolutionary War” provides a detailed overview of the American battle for independence and the forging of a nation. From the earliest skirmishes at Lexington and Concord to the decisive victory at Yorktown, to the writing of the Constitution and the struggles of early national America, this book tracks both the logistical and intellectual dimensions of the "revolution," which, as John Adams said, took place "in the hearts and minds of Americans . . . before a single drop of blood was shed." As much as it vividly documents the particulars of battle, it is the dizzying aftermath of the war and the complexities of fulfilling the "idea" of America that form the impressive substance of this book. Also discussed are the social, cultural, and artistic advances of the post-Revolutionary period, including women's suffrage and the beginning of public education, with special emphasis given to the "American Renaissance" and the rising of distinctly American literature.

Southern Writers

A New Biographical Dictionary
Author: Joseph M. Flora,Amber Vogel
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807131237
Category: Reference
Page: 504
View: 9471

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This new edition of Southern Writers assumes its distinguished predecessor's place as the essential reference on literary artists of the American South. Broadly expanded and thoroughly revised, it boasts 604 entries-nearly double the earlier edition's-written by 264 scholars. For every figure major and minor, from the venerable and canonical to the fresh and innovative, a biographical sketch and chronological list of published works provide comprehensive, concise, up-to-date information. Here in one convenient source are the South's novelists and short story writers, poets and dramatists, memoirists and essayists, journalists, scholars, and biographers from the colonial period to the twenty-first century. What constitutes a "southern writer" is always a matter for debate. Editors Joseph M. Flora and Amber Vogel have used a generous definition that turns on having a significant connection to the region, in either a personal or literary sense. New to this volume are younger writers who have emerged in the quarter century since the dictionary's original publication, as well as older talents previously unknown or unacknowledged. For almost every writer found in the previous edition, a new biography has been commissioned. Drawn from the very best minds on southern literature and covering the full spectrum of its practitioners, Southern Writers is an indispensable reference book for anyone intrigued by the subject.