A History of Journalism in China


Author: Fang Hanqi
Publisher: Silkroad Press
ISBN: 9789814332279
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 2160

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This series provides a comprehensive history of journalism in China. It chronicles two millennia of journalistic history from the 2nd century BC to the 1990s, and includes coverage of newspapers, periodicals, news agencies, broadcast television, photography, documentary film, journal cartoons, journal education, as well as information about reporters, journalists, and other aspects of journalism. Volume 1 tracks the development of journalism in ancient China, from the Pre-Qin period to the late Qing Dynasty. It also draws a full picture of the early publishing activities of both foreigners and the Chinese in nineteenth century China.

Wuhan, 1938

War, Refugees, and the Making of Modern China
Author: Stephen R. MacKinnon
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520934601
Category: History
Page: 204
View: 3283

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During the spring of 1938, a flood of Chinese refugees displaced by the Anti-Japanese War (1937-1945) converged on the central Yangzi valley tricity complex of Wuhan. For ten remarkable months, in a highly charged atmosphere of carnage, heroism, and desperation, Wuhan held out against the Japanese in what would become a turning point in the war—and one that attracted international attention. Stephen MacKinnon for the first time tells the full story of Wuhan's defense and fall, and how the siege's aftermath led to new directions in the history of modern Chinese culture, society, and politics.

The Chinese Journalist

Mediating Information in the World's Most Populous Country
Author: Hugo Burgh
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134403879
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 4117

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The Chinese Journalist provides an intriguing introduction to Chinese journalists and their roles within society for both students of Media and Asian Studies. The book initially offers a background history of journalists and the media in Communist China before examining the origins and development of Chinese journalism in the nineteenth century.

Die Anfänge des Journalismus in China (1860-1911)


Author: Natascha Vittinghoff
Publisher: Otto Harrassowitz Verlag
ISBN: 9783447046343
Category: History
Page: 507
View: 2901

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Wie in Europa und angeregt durch auslandische Akteure vor Ort entwickelte sich die periodische Presse in China ab Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts innerhalb kurzester Zeit zum dominanten Medium neuer gesellschaftlicher Diskurse und wurde zum Verhandlungsort der zentralen gesellschaftlichen Fragen der spaten Qing Zeit. Die verschiedensten Akteure des neuen Journalismus - Literaten, Unternehmer, Missionare, Regierungsvertreter oder Lokalbeamte unterschiedlicher Nationalitat - verband vor allem die Uberzeugung, Kenntnisse einer neu wahrgenommenen Welt gewinnen und vermitteln zu mussen. Als wirkungsmachtige Alternative zur staatlichen Informationspolitik traten sie in oftmals konfliktgeladene Konkurrenz mit herkommlichen Formen offentlicher Kommunikation. Ausgehend von einer kulturwissenschaftlichen Perspektive beschaftigt sich dieser Band mit den Grundlagen dieses neuen Journalismus: den involvierten sozialen Akteuren, den technischen Produktionsbedingungen, den Inhalten der Texte und dem Prozess der Professionalisierung, um vor diesem Hintergrund die Selbstwahrnehmung und Positionierung der Akteure im offentlichen Raum zu diskutieren. Einbezogen in die Untersuchung ist eine kritische historiographische Betrachtung bisher gangiger Vorurteile uber die damalige Rolle der Presse und ihrer Journalisten.

Modern Chinese Legal Reform

New Perspectives
Author: Xiaobing Li,Qiang Fang
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813141214
Category: History
Page: 316
View: 5865

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China's rapid socioeconomic transformation of the past twenty years has led to dramatic changes in its judicial system and legal practices. As China becomes more powerful on the world stage, the global community has dedicated more resources and attention to understanding the country's evolving democratization, and policymakers have identified the development of civil liberties and long-term legal reforms as crucial for the nation's acceptance as a global partner. Modern Chinese Legal Reform is designed as a legal and political research tool to help English-speaking scholars interpret the many recent changes to China's legal system. Investigating subjects such as constitutional history, the intersection of politics and law, democratization, civil legal practices, and judicial mechanisms, the essays in this volume situate current constitutional debates in the context of both the country's ideology and traditions and the wider global community. Editors Xiaobing Li and Qiang Fang bring together scholars from multiple disciplines to provide a comprehensive and balanced look at a difficult subject. Featuring newly available official sources and interviews with Chinese administrators, judges, law-enforcement officers, and legal experts, this essential resource enables readers to view key events through the eyes of individuals who are intimately acquainted with the challenges and successes of the past twenty years.

The Birth of Vietnamese Political Journalism

Saigon, 1916-1930
Author: Philippe M.F. Peycam
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231528043
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 6491

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Philippe M. F. Peycam completes the first ever English-language study of Vietnam's emerging political press and its resistance to colonialism. Published in the decade that preceded the Communist Party's founding, this journalistic phenomenon established a space for public, political contestation that fundamentally changed Vietnamese attitudes and the outlook of Southeast Asia. Peycam directly links Saigon's colonial urbanization to the creation of new modes of individual and collective political agency. To better justify their presence, French colonialists implemented a peculiar brand of republican imperialism to encourage the development of a highly controlled print capitalism. Yet the Vietnamese made clever use of this new form of political expression, subverting colonial discourse and putting French rulers on the defensive, while simultaneously stoking Vietnamese aspirations for autonomy. Peycam specifically considers the work of Western-educated Vietnamese journalists who, in their legal writings, called attention to the politics of French rule. Peycam rejects the notion that Communist and nationalist ideologies changed the minds of "alienated" Vietnamese during this period. Rather, he credits colonial urban modernity with shaping the Vietnamese activist-journalist and the role of the French, even at their most coercive, along with the modern public Vietnamese intellectual and his responsibility toward the group. Countering common research on anticolonial nationalism and its assumptions of ethno-cultural homogeneity, Peycam follows the merging of French republican and anarchist traditions with neo-Confucian Vietnamese behavior, giving rise to modern Vietnamese public activism, its autonomy, and its contradictory aspirations. Interweaving biography with archival newspaper and French police sources, he writes from within these journalists' changing political consciousness and their shifting perception of social roles.

Key Readings in Journalism


Author: Elliot King,Jane Chapman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113576767X
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 424
View: 2119

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Key Readings in Journalism brings together over thirty essential writings that every student of journalism should know. Designed as a primary text for undergraduate students, each reading was carefully chosen in response to extensive surveys from educators reflecting on the needs of today’s journalism classroom. Readings range from critical and historical studies of journalism, such as Walter Lippmann’s Public Opinion and Michael Schudson’s Discovering the News, to examples of classic reporting, such as Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward’s All the President’s Men. They are supplemented by additional readings to broaden the volume’s scope in every dimension, including gender, race, and nationality. The volume is arranged thematically to enable students to think deeply and broadly about journalism—its development, its practice, its key individuals and institutions, its social impact, and its future—and section introductions and headnotes precede each reading to provide context and key points for discussion.

How the Market is Changing China's News

The Case of Xinhua News Agency
Author: Xin Xin
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739150952
Category: History
Page: 161
View: 6573

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This book provides a micro-analysis of the impact of marketisation and globalization on China's media system over the last three decades with a focus on Xinhua News Agency – one of the most influential propaganda apparatuses of the Chinese Communist Party. It investigates not only Xinhua itself, but also its evolving relations with news sources, media clients and other social institutions.

Love and Marriage in Globalizing China


Author: Wang Pan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131768883X
Category: Social Science
Page: 248
View: 6185

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As China globalizes, the number of marriages between Chinese people and foreigners is increasing. These Chinese--foreign marriages have profound implications for China’s cultural identity. This book, based on extensive original research, outlines the different types of Chinese--foreign marriage, and divorce, and the changing scale and changing patterns of such marriages, and divorces, and examines how such marriages and divorces are portrayed in different kinds of media. It shows how those types of Chinese--foreign marriage where Chinese patriotism and Chinese values are preserved are depicted favourably, whereas other kinds of Chinese--foreign marriage, especially those where Chinese women marry foreign nationals, are disapproved of, male foreign nationals being seen as having a propensity to infidelity, deception, violence and taking advantage of Chinese women. The book contrasts the portrayal of Chinese--foreign marriage with the reality, and with the depiction of Chinese--Chinese marriage where many of the same problems apply. Overall, the book sheds much light on changing social processes and on current imaginings of China’s place in the world.

Political Communication in China

Convergence or Divergence Between the Media and Political System?
Author: Wenfang Tang,Shanto Iyengar
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135709998
Category: Social Science
Page: 138
View: 4276

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It is widely recognised that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) uses the media to set the agenda for political discourse, propagate official policies, monitor public opinion, and rally regime support. State agencies in China control the full spectrum of media programming, either through ownership or the power to regulate. Political Communication in China examines the two factors which have contributed to the rapid development of media infrastructure in China: technology and commercialization. Economic development led to technological advancement, which in turn brought about the rapid modernization of all forms of communication, from ‘old’ media such as television to the Internet, cell phones, and satellite communications. This volume examines how these recent developments have affected the relationship between the CCP and the mass media as well as the implications of this evolving relationship for understanding Chinese citizens’ media use, political attitudes, and behaviour. The chapters in this book represent a diverse range of research methods, from surveys, content analysis, and field interviews to the manipulation of aggregate statistical data. The result is a lively debate which creates many opportunities for future research into the fundamental question of convergence between political and media regimes. This book was originally published as a special issue of the journal Political Communication.

A Modern History of Hong Kong

1841-1997
Author: Steve Tsang
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857730835
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 6612

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This major history of Hong Kong tells the remarkable story of how a cluster of remote fishing villages grew into an icon of capitalism. The story began in 1842 with the founding of the Crown Colony after the First Anglo-Chinese war - the original ‘Opium War’. As premier power in Europe and an expansionist empire, Britain first created in Hong Kong a major naval station and the principal base to open the Celestial Chinese Empire to trade. Working in parallel with the locals, the British built it up to become a focus for investment in the region and an international centre with global shipping, banking and financial interests. Yet by far the most momentous change in the history of this prosperous, capitalist colony was its return in 1997 to ‘Mother China’, the most powerful Communist state in the world. Steve Tsang, drawing on a vast array of official and private sources, both Chinese and European, traces the development of the classic Crown Colony government with its Governors, elite Administrative Officers and non-elected Executive and Legislative Councils, and British-based legal and education systems. Whilst this structure sheltered and nurtured the astounding economic take-off, the vital engine of this development was the mass-immigration of Chinese - hard-working, entrepreneurial, quick to absorb Western ideas while retaining Chinese traditions - blending with expatriate European business interests. The author goes on to examine the effect of the trauma of invasion and defeat at the hands of the Japanese in the Second World War, the stirrings of democracy, the beginnings of Hong Kong identity and the growing influence of China. The story culminates in the saga of the end of the empire with the emotional hauling down of the Union flag and the raising of China’s colours.

Media and the Chinese Diaspora

Community, Communications and Commerce
Author: Wanning Sun
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134263589
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 422

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The importance of the Chinese diaspora is widely recognized. Wanning Sun examines the key role of the media in the Chinese diaspora. She focuses especially on the media's role in communication, in fostering a sense of community, in defining different kinds of 'transnational Chineseness' - overseas Chinese communities are often very different from one country to another - and in showing how media communication is linked to commerce, which is often a key activity of the overseas Chinese. Revealing a great deal about the vibrancy and dynamism of the Chinese-language media, the book considers the Chinese diaspora in Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand and Australia, showing how it plays a crucial role in the changing nature of the Chinese diaspora.

Reinventing Professionalism

Journalism and News in Global Perspective
Author: Silvio Waisbord
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 074566508X
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 280
View: 4026

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Current anxiety about the future of news makes it opportune to revisit the notion of professionalism in journalism. Media expert Silvio Waisbord takes this pressing issue as his theme and argues that “professional journalism” is both a normative and analytical notion. It refers to reporting that observes certain ethical standards as well as to collective efforts by journalists to exercise control over the news. Professionalism should not be narrowly associated with the normative ideal as it historically developed in the West during the past century. Instead, it needs to be approached as a valuable concept to throw into sharp relief how journalists define conditions and rules of work within certain settings. Professionalization is about the specialization of labor and control of occupational practice. These issues are important, particularly amidst the combination of political, technological and economic trends that have profoundly unsettled the foundations of modern journalism. By doing so, they have stimulated the reinvention of professionalism. This engaging and insightful book critically examines the meanings, expectations, and critiques of professional journalism in a global context.

American Editor in Early Revolutionary China

John William Powell and the China Weekly/Monthly Review
Author: Neil O'Brien
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135945713
Category: History
Page: 332
View: 5878

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This is a study of Sino-American relations and the editorial policy of the China Weekly Review / China Monthly Review , published in Shanghai by John William Powell during the Chinese Civil War and the Korean War. The Review supported US attempts in early 1946 to avert civil war through the creation of a coalition government. By 1947 it reflected growing disillusionment with Guomindang policies, and increasing sympathy for the demands of impoverished students and faculty for multi-party democracy and peace. As the Civil War shifted in favour of the Communists in late 1948, Powell and the Review counseled US businessmen to remain in Shanghai and urged the US government to establish working relations with the Communists, and later to recognize the new regime. Staying in Shanghai to report changes engendered by the Communist victory, the Review 's staff accomodated themselves to the new orthodoxy and to the regime's coordination of the press. During the Korean War, the Review opposed the expanding US air war, becoming the foremost American purveyor of Chinese and North Korean allegations of American use of bacteriological weapons. The Review was also utilized for the political indoctrination of US prisoners-of-war by the Chinese and North Koreans. After closing the Review in July 1953 and returning to the United States, Powell, his wife Sylvia Campbell and assistant editor Julian Schuman were put on trial for sedition. As the government narrowed its focus to the bacteriological warfare issue, Powell and his lawyers countered by trying to prove the veracity of the charges, seeking witnesses in China and North Korea. Adverse publicity led to a mistrial in January 1959 and limitations in both the sedition and treason statutes ended plans to renew prosecution. Powell and the Review had insisted that positive diplomatic and economic relations between China and the United States were both possible and desirable. The gradual normalization of trade, investment and political relations since the 1970s seemed to validate this belief. In the post-Cold War age when Sino-American relations are often strained and tempestuous, this book serves as a reminder of the value of making the extra effort to achiece understanding.

Creating a Public

People and Press in Meiji Japan
Author: James L. Huffman
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 9780824818821
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 573
View: 5628

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No institution did more to create a modern citizenry than the newspaper press of the Meiji period (1868-1912). Here was a collection of highly diverse, private voices that provided increasing numbers of readers - many millions by the end of the period - with both its fresh picture of the world and a changing sense of its own place in that world. Creating a Public is the first comprehensive history of Japan's early newspaper press to appear in English in more than half a century. Drawing on decades of research in newspaper articles and editorials, journalists' memoirs and essays, government documents and press analyses, it tells the story of Japan's newspaper press from its elitist beginnings just before the fall of the Tokugawa regime through its years as a shaper of a new political system in the 1880s to its emergence as a nationalistic, often sensational, medium early in the twentieth century. More than an institutional study, this work not only traces the evolution of the press' leading papers, their changing approaches to circulation, news, and advertising, and the personalities of their leading editors; it also examines the interplay between Japan's elite institutions and its rising urban working classes from a wholly new perspective - that of the press. What emerges is the transformation of Japan's commoners (minshu) from uninformed, disconnected subjects to active citizens in the national political process - a modern public. Conversely, minshu begin to play a decisive role in making Japan's newspapers livelier, more sensational, and more influential. As Huffman states in his Introduction: "The newspapers turned the people into citizens; the people turned the papers into mass media." In addition to providing new perspectives on Meiji society and political life, Creating a Public addresses themes important to the study of mass media around the world: the conflict between social responsibility and commercialization, the role of the press in spurring national development, the interplay between readers' tastes and editors' principles, the impact of sensationalism on national social and political life. Huffman raises these issues in a comparative context, relating the Meiji press to American and Japanese press systems at similar points of development. With its broad coverage of the press' role in modernizing Japan, Creating a Public will be of great interest to students of mass media in general as well as specialists of Japanese history.

Humanitarian Photography

A History
Author: Heide Fehrenbach,Davide Rodogno
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316240509
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 5680

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For well over a century, humanitarians and their organizations have used photographic imagery and the latest media technologies to raise public awareness and funds to alleviate human suffering. This volume examines the historical evolution of what we today call 'humanitarian photography' - the mobilization of photography in the service of humanitarian initiatives across state boundaries - and asks how we can account for the shift from the fitful and debated use of photography for humanitarian purposes in the late nineteenth century to our current situation in which photographers market themselves as 'humanitarian photographers'. This book investigates how humanitarian photography emerged and how it operated in diverse political, institutional, and social contexts, bringing together more than a dozen scholars working on the history of humanitarianism, international organizations and nongovernmental organizations, and visual culture in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and the United States.

The Transformation of Investigative Journalism in China

From Journalists to Activists
Author: Haiyan Wang
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1498527620
Category: History
Page: 202
View: 7376

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This book examines how investigative journalism in China has challenged state power and broadened the scope of calls for democratic reform. It also analyzes the recent emergence of activist journalists in China who, with the aid of new media technologies, have operated not only as detached observers but also as engaged organizers of social movements.

Hard Corps - Legends of the Corps


Author: Andrew Anthony Bufalo
Publisher: All American Books
ISBN: 9780974579351
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 328
View: 664

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The Marine Corps' reputation as the world's premier fighting force was forged on many battlefields by a succession of extraordinary men. Here are their stories. The battles: Belleau Wood, Samar, Makin, Iwo Jima, Hue City, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The Marines: O'Bannon, Daly, Basilone, Puller, Boyington, and Chontosh - and much more. If anyone ever asks what makes Marines special, give them a copy of this book!

Shanghai Homes

Palimpsests of Private Life
Author: Jie Li
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231538170
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 722

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In the dazzling global metropolis of Shanghai, what has it meant to call this city home? In this account—part microhistory, part memoir—Jie Li salvages intimate recollections by successive generations of inhabitants of two vibrant, culturally mixed Shanghai alleyways from the Republican, Maoist, and post-Mao eras. Exploring three dimensions of private life—territories, artifacts, and gossip—Li re-creates the sounds, smells, look, and feel of home over a tumultuous century. First built by British and Japanese companies in 1915 and 1927, the two homes at the center of this narrative were located in an industrial part of the former "International Settlement." Before their recent demolition, they were nestled in Shanghai's labyrinthine alleyways, which housed more than half of the city's population from the Sino-Japanese War to the Cultural Revolution. Through interviews with her own family members as well as their neighbors, classmates, and co-workers, Li weaves a complex social tapestry reflecting the lived experiences of ordinary people struggling to absorb and adapt to major historical change. These voices include workers, intellectuals, Communists, Nationalists, foreigners, compradors, wives, concubines, and children who all fought for a foothold and haven in this city, witnessing spectacles so full of farce and pathos they could only be whispered as secret histories.