A Field Guide to Getting Lost


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101118719
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 224
View: 324

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A stimulating exploration of wandering, being lost, and the uses of the unknown from the author of Men Explain Things To Me Written as a series of autobiographical essays, A Field Guide to Getting Lost draws on emblematic moments and relationships in Rebecca Solnit's life to explore issues of uncertainty, trust, loss, memory, desire, and place. Solnit is interested in the stories we use to navigate our way through the world, and the places we traverse, from wilderness to cities, in finding ourselves, or losing ourselves. While deeply personal, her own stories link up to larger stories, from captivity narratives of early Americans to the use of the color blue in Renaissance painting, not to mention encounters with tortoises, monks, punk rockers, mountains, deserts, and the movie Vertigo. The result is a distinctive, stimulating voyage of discovery. From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Field Guide To Getting Lost


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Canongate Books
ISBN: 184767660X
Category: Philosophy
Page: 224
View: 2812

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In this investigation into loss, losing and being lost, Rebecca Solnit explores the challenges of living with uncertainty. A Field Guide to Getting Lost takes in subjects as eclectic as memory and mapmaking, Hitchcock movies and Renaissance painting, Beautifully written, this book combines memoir, history and philosophy, shedding glittering new light on the way we live now.

The Faraway Nearby


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143125494
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 259
View: 4445

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A companion to A Field Guide for Getting Lost explores the ways that people construct lives from stories and connect to each other through empathy, narrative and imagination, sharing illustrative anecdotes about historical figures and members of her own family. By the National Book Critics Circle Award-winning author of River of Shadows.

Wanderlust

A History of Walking
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101199558
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 4335

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A passionate, thought provoking exploration of walking as a political and cultural activity, from the author of Men Explain Things to Me Drawing together many histories--of anatomical evolution and city design, of treadmills and labyrinths, of walking clubs and sexual mores--Rebecca Solnit creates a fascinating portrait of the range of possibilities presented by walking. Arguing that the history of walking includes walking for pleasure as well as for political, aesthetic, and social meaning, Solnit focuses on the walkers whose everyday and extreme acts have shaped our culture, from philosophers to poets to mountaineers. She profiles some of the most significant walkers in history and fiction--from Wordsworth to Gary Snyder, from Jane Austen's Elizabeth Bennet to Andre Breton's Nadja--finding a profound relationship between walking and thinking and walking and culture. Solnit argues for the necessity of preserving the time and space in which to walk in our ever more car-dependent and accelerated world.

Storming the Gates of Paradise

Landscapes for Politics
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520256569
Category: History
Page: 416
View: 4736

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An anthology of nearly forty essays, representing the author's work over the past ten years, offers an insightful overview of American politics, current affairs, culture, society, and history, written from the perspective of a noted environmentalist, anti-globalization activist, and public intellectual. By the author of A Field Guide to Getting Lost.

A Book of Migrations


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1844677087
Category: Travel
Page: 208
View: 920

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"A brilliant meditation on travel."—The New York Times In this acclaimed exploration of the culture of others, Rebecca Solnit travels through Ireland, the land of her long-forgotten maternal ancestors. A Book of Migrations portrays in microcosm a history made of great human tides of invasion, colonization, emigration, nomadism and tourism. Enriched by cross-cultural comparisons with the history of the American West, A Book of Migrations carves a new route through Ireland's history, literature and landscape.

Proust's Way: A Field Guide to In Search of Lost Time


Author: Roger Shattuck
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393078701
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 288
View: 3079

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"Shattuck leaves us not only with a deepened appreciation of Proust's great work but of all great literature as well."—Richard Bernstein, New York Times For any reader who has been humbled by the language, the density, or the sheer weight of Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time, Roger Shattuck is a godsend. Winner of the National Book Award for Marcel Proust, a sweeping examination of Proust's life and works, Shattuck now offers a useful and eminently readable guidebook to Proust's epic masterpiece, and a contemplation of memory and consciousness throughout great literature. Here, Shattuck laments Proust's defenselessness against zealous editors, praises some translations, and presents Proust as a novelist whose philosophical gifts were matched only by his irrepressible comic sense. Proust's Way, the culmination of a lifetime of scholarship, will serve as the next generation's guide to one of the world's finest writers of fiction.

River of Shadows

Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101662662
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 320
View: 329

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The world as we know it today began in California in the late 1800s, and Eadweard Muybridge had a lot to do with it. This striking assertion is at the heart of Rebecca Solnit’s new book, which weaves together biography, history, and fascinating insights into art and technology to create a boldly original portrait of America on the threshold of modernity. The story of Muybridge—who in 1872 succeeded in capturing high-speed motion photographically—becomes a lens for a larger story about the acceleration and industrialization of everyday life. Solnit shows how the peculiar freedoms and opportunities of post–Civil War California led directly to the two industries—Hollywood and Silicon Valley—that have most powerfully defined contemporary society.

As Eve Said to the Serpent

On Landscape, Gender, and Art
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820324937
Category: Social Science
Page: 234
View: 4161

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A multidisciplinary compilation of nineteen incisive essays ranges from the formality of traditional art criticism to intimate, lyrical meditations as they explore nuclear test sites, the meaning of national borders and geographical features, and the idea of the feminine and the sublime.

The Mother of All Questions


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 1608467201
Category: Social Science
Page: 192
View: 9042

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Praise for Men Explain Things to Me: "It's a fraught time to be female in America (or should I say fraught-er), and Rebecca Solnit's Men Explain Things to Me is the most clarifying, soothing, and socially aware document I've read on the topic this year."—Lena Dunham, Wall Street Journal "The Antidote to Mansplaining."—The Stranger "Feminist, frequently funny, unflinchingly honest, and often scathing in its conclusions."—Salon In a timely and incisive follow-up to her national bestseller Men Explain Things to Me, Rebecca Solnit offers sharp commentary on women who refuse to be silenced, misogynistic violence, the fragile masculinity of the literary canon, the gender binary, the recent history of rape jokes, and much more. In characteristic style, Solnit mixes humor, keen analysis, and sharp insight in these eleven essays. Writer, historian, and activist Rebecca Solnit is the author of eighteen or so books on feminism, western and indigenous history, popular power, social change and insurrection, wandering and walking, hope and disaster, including the books Men Explain Things to Me and Hope in the Dark, both also with Haymarket; a trilogy of atlases of American cities; The Faraway Nearby; A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities that Arise in Disaster; A Field Guide to Getting Lost; Wanderlust: A History of Walking; and River of Shadows, Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West (for which she received a Guggenheim, the National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism, and the Lannan Literary Award). A product of the California public education system from kindergarten to graduate school, she is a columnist at Harper's and a regular contributor to the Guardian.

Notes on a Lost Flute

A Field Guide to the Wabanaki
Author: Kerry Hardy
Publisher: Down East Books
ISBN: 0892728884
Category: Social Science
Page: 192
View: 2598

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Anyone interested in Native American lifeways will want to pore over Notes on a Lost Flute. Hardy brings together his expertise in forestry, horticulture, and environmental science to tell us about New England when its primary inhabitants were the native Wabanaki tribes. With experience in teaching adults and children, Hardy has written this book in an entertaining and accessible style, making it of interest and useful to adults and students alike.

The Blue of Distance


Author: Anne Carson,Rebecca Solnit,Kevin Finneran
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780934324700
Category: Art
Page: 120
View: 1573

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"The Blue of Distance," published to accompany a group exhibition at the Aspen Art Museum, is a reflection on the color blue's uncanny relationship to absence, desire and distance. Featuring photography, drawing, sculpture and sound by the artists Vija Celmins, Jason Dodge, Félix González-Torres, Roni Horn, Marie Jager, Catherine Opie, Paul Ramirez Jonas, Cy Twombly and Cerith Wyn Evans, the publication explores the blue at the far edge of what can be seen, the color of the horizon, the ocean and the immaterial. Weaving together a larger narrative about the distance between us and the objects of our desire, the catalogue includes an essay by Courtenay Finn, an excerpt from Rebecca Solnit's "A Field Guide to Getting Lost" and a new piece by Anne Carson.

Men Explain Things to Me


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 1608464571
Category: Social Science
Page: 130
View: 4717

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In her comic, scathing essay “Men Explain Things to Me,” Rebecca Solnit took on what often goes wrong in conversations between men and women. She wrote about men who wrongly assume they know things and wrongly assume women don’t, about why this arises, and how this aspect of the gender wars works, airing some of her own hilariously awful encounters. She ends on a serious note— because the ultimate problem is the silencing of women who have something to say, including those saying things like, “He’s trying to kill me!” This book features that now-classic essay with six perfect complements, including an examination of the great feminist writer Virginia Woolf ’s embrace of mystery, of not knowing, of doubt and ambiguity, a highly original inquiry into marriage equality, and a terrifying survey of the scope of contemporary violence against women. Writer, historian, and activist Rebecca Solnit is the author of eighteen or so books on feminism, western and indigenous history, popular power, social change and insurrection, wandering and walking, hope and disaster, including the books Men Explain Things to Me and Hope in the Dark, both also with Haymarket; a trilogy of atlases of American cities; The Faraway Nearby; A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities that Arise in Disaster; A Field Guide to Getting Lost; Wanderlust: A History of Walking; and River of Shadows, Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West (for which she received a Guggenheim, the National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism, and the Lannan Literary Award). A product of the California public education system from kindergarten to graduate school, she is a columnist at Harper's and a regular contributor to the Guardian.

Infinite City

A San Francisco Atlas
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520262492
Category: History
Page: 156
View: 7516

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What makes a place? Rebecca Solnit reinvents the traditional atlas, searching for layers of meaning & connections of experience across San Francisco.

A Paradise Built in Hell

The Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101459010
Category: Social Science
Page: 368
View: 7933

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A startling investigation of what people do in disasters and why it matters Why is it that in the aftermath of a disaster? whether manmade or natural?people suddenly become altruistic, resourceful, and brave? What makes the newfound communities and purpose many find in the ruins and crises after disaster so joyous? And what does this joy reveal about ordinarily unmet social desires and possibilities? In A Paradise Built in Hell, award-winning author Rebecca Solnit explores these phenomena, looking at major calamities from the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco through the 1917 explosion that tore up Halifax, Nova Scotia, the 1985 Mexico City earthquake, 9/11, and Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. She examines how disaster throws people into a temporary utopia of changed states of mind and social possibilities, as well as looking at the cost of the widespread myths and rarer real cases of social deterioration during crisis. This is a timely and important book from an acclaimed author whose work consistently locates unseen patterns and meanings in broad cultural histories.

Hope in the Dark

Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 1608465799
Category: Social Science
Page: 192
View: 3835

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"No writer has better understood the mix of fear and possibility, peril and exuberance that's marked this new millennium." —Bill McKibben A book as powerful and influential as Rebecca Solnit's Men Explain Things to Me, her Hope in the Dark was written to counter the despair of radicals at a moment when they were focused on their losses and had turned their back to the victories behind them—and the unimaginable changes soon to come. In it, she makes a radical case for hope as a commitment to act in a world whose future remains uncertain and unknowable. Drawing on her decades of activism and a wide reading of environmental, cultural, and political history, Solnit argued that radicals have a long, neglected history of transformative victories, that the positive consequences of our acts are not always immediately seen, directly knowable, or even measurable, and that pessimism and despair rest on an unwarranted confidence about what is going to happen next. Now, with a moving new introduction explaining how the book came about and a new afterword that helps teach us how to hope and act in our unnerving world, she brings a new illumination to the darkness of 2016 in an unforgettable new edition of this classic book. Writer, historian, and activist Rebecca Solnit is the author of eighteen or so books on feminism, western and indigenous history, popular power, social change and insurrection, wandering and walking, hope and disaster, including the books Men Explain Things to Me and Hope in the Dark, both also with Haymarket; a trilogy of atlases of American cities; The Faraway Nearby; A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities that Arise in Disaster; A Field Guide to Getting Lost; Wanderlust: A History of Walking; and River of Shadows, Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West (for which she received a Guggenheim, the National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism, and the Lannan Literary Award). A product of the California public education system from kindergarten to graduate school, she is a columnist at Harper's and a regular contributor to the Guardian.

The Encyclopedia of Trouble and Spaciousness


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Trinity University Press
ISBN: 1595341994
Category: Social Science
Page: 344
View: 8910

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The incomparable Rebecca Solnit, author of more than a dozen acclaimed, prizewinning books of nonfiction, brings the same dazzling writing to the essays in Encyclopedia of Trouble and Spaciousness. As the title suggests, the territory of Solnit’s concerns is vast, and in her signature alchemical style she combines commentary on history, justice, war and peace, and explorations of place, art, and community, all while writing with the lyricism of a poet to achieve incandescence and wisdom. Gathered here are celebrated iconic essays along with little-known pieces that create a powerful survey of the world we live in, from the jungles of the Zapatistas in Mexico to the splendors of the Arctic. This rich collection tours places as diverse as Haiti and Iceland; movements like Occupy Wall Street and the Arab Spring; an original take on the question of who did Henry David Thoreau’s laundry; and a searching look at what the hatred of country music really means. Solnit moves nimbly from Orwell to Elvis, to contemporary urban gardening to 1970s California macramé and punk rock, and on to searing questions about the environment, freedom, family, class, work, and friendship. It’s no wonder she’s been compared in Bookforum to Susan Sontag and Annie Dillard and in the San Francisco Chronicle to Joan Didion. The Encyclopedia of Trouble and Spaciousness proves Rebecca Solnit worthy of the accolades and honors she’s received. Rarely can a reader find such penetrating critiques of our time and its failures leavened with such generous heapings of hope. Solnit looks back to history and the progress of political movements to find an antidote to despair in what many feel as lost causes. In its encyclopedic reach and its generous compassion, Solnit’s collection charts a way through the thickets of our complex social and political worlds. Her essays are a beacon for readers looking for alternative ideas in these imperiled times.

Tales of Two Americas

Stories of Inequality in a Divided Nation
Author: John Freeman
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143131036
Category: FICTION
Page: 330
View: 3384

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Thirty-six major contemporary writers examine life in a deeply divided America--including Anthony Doerr, Ann Patchett, Roxane Gay, Rebecca Solnit, Hector Tobar, Joyce Carol Oates, Edwidge Danticat, Richard Russo, Eula Bliss, Karen Russell, and many more America is broken. You don't need a fistful of statistics to know this. Visit any city, and evidence of our shattered social compact will present itself. From Appalachia to the Rust Belt and down to rural Texas, the gap between the wealthiest and the poorest stretches to unimaginable chasms. Whether the cause of this inequality is systemic injustice, the entrenchment of racism in our culture, the long war on drugs, or immigration policies, it endangers not only the American Dream but our very lives. In Tales of Two Americas, some of the literary world's most exciting writers look beyond numbers and wages to convey what it feels like to live in this divided nation. Their extraordinarily powerful stories, essays, and poems demonstrate how boundaries break down when experiences are shared, and that in sharing our stories we can help to alleviate a suffering that touches so many people.

National Geographic Complete Birds of North America


Author: Jonathan Alderfer,Jon Lloyd Dunn
Publisher: National Geographic Books
ISBN: 1426213735
Category: Nature
Page: 743
View: 5630

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Examines more than eighty avian families, including an overview of plumage, behavior, distribution, taxonomy, and conservation, and describes all 962 species, covering identification, similar species, voice, status, and distribution.